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194 | LinkedIn Job Search | Andrew Chimka, LinkedIn

Episode 194 is live! This week, we talk with Andrew Chimka in San Fransisco, California.

Andrew is a Senior Product Manager at LinkedIn. Andrew is working to connect people with opportunity by building and scaling LinkedIn’s Jobs platform.

On today’s episode, Andrew shares:

  • What is the open candidate feature within LinkedIn and why should we use it?
  • What are a few of the features that are included with the paid version of LinkedIn that will benefit us if we’re currently looking for a job?
  • What are a few things that will help us improve our profile and stand out?

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about the LinkedIn features that Andrew describes, check out the LinkedIn website at LinkedIn Jobs.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find the show!

My New Pet Peeve

There’s this thing that happens when you see something unexpected. You just can’t unsee it. Once you know, there’s no turning back. That happened for me one year ago. I’ve tried to push it out of my mind, but I just can’t any longer.

Professionals on LinkedIn are posting some very unprofessional things. It’s happening all the time, and frankly, it’s shocking.

There’s been an influx of cartoon profile photos. There are also overly casual profile photos taken with baseball caps on. There are profile photos with children and pets. The professional is posing along with their two babies or two cats or two dogs.

There are job titles like, “Not Channing Tatum’s dad” and “Defender of the Universe.” In fact, if you look, there are 64 professionals on LinkedIn who are apparently defending our universe.

There are even posts featuring ultrasound photos, announcing the births of new babies.

At first glance, these things all seem fun. These people seem so relatable. This personal information allows connections on LinkedIn to learn more about the person quickly.

But, this is the problem. Not everybody can post photos with their babies and cats on LinkedIn and be taken seriously in the professional world. Not everyone can post a cartoon profile photo and expect to ever get a new job.

I’ll be honest. The people primarily posting these things are young male executives in their thirties and forties. I’m 100% certain they have the very best of intentions. They want to be relatable. They want to show they put their family first. They want to be funny. They want to show their personality.

With this in mind, you’re probably wondering why in the world this is an issue at all. Please hear me out.

It’s an issue because many people cannot post a cartoon photo as a LinkedIn profile photo and be taken seriously. For example, I could never post a photo with children and expect to land a job interview. Revealing my whole self is not a privilege that I have if I want to be employed.

To put it in perspective, I have been directly asked in job interviews whether or not I’m planning to have any children soon. As hard as it is to believe, the question is sometimes used as a screening tool.

To the young, successful men out there, this column is for you. I respect what you’re trying to do. I respect that you want to be relatable. I love that you’re showing me that your family is an important part of your life. I know that you are creating these fun profiles for all of the right reasons.

But, we can’t all share those things and be taken seriously. Let’s keep LinkedIn as the professional site it is. And when we become friends, we’ll connect on Facebook and I can learn about your kids, your spouse, and your awesome dogs there.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

The Six Biggest Mistakes You’re Making on LinkedIn

You’ve decided you want to get a job. The first thing you may want to do is update your LinkedIn profile. But, this is the problem. You’re doing a few things wrong. Those things are going to slow down your search, and you don’t even know it.

1. You have no photo.  You’ve got to get a photo. It’s no longer okay to opt-out of having a photo on LinkedIn. It helps people to know you’re a real person. And, if there’s more than one person with your name, it helps them to find you.

2. Your URL is a mess. You may have not thought about this, but check out the URL on your LinkedIn page. It will begin with www.linkedin.com/in/. Then, it will have something after the slash. If you haven’t customized your LinkedIn URL, it will be long and will contain many numbers at the end. Take a few minutes to create a custom URL. You can do this by clicking the link that says, “Edit public profile and URL.” When you pick your new URL, be sure that it is simple, and doesn’t contain a reference to your birth year or graduation year. You don’t want employers to guess your age from the start.

3. Your profile isn’t up to date. I know, you’ve been busy. 2018 was a crazy year for everyone. This is the time to update your profile. Add in your current and previous work. Be sure to include your education.

4. You don’t have enough connections. I know that LinkedIn isn’t the same thing as Facebook. But, to use it effectively, you need to connect to others. Connect to colleagues, classmates, and professional friends. Your goal should be a minimum of 500 LinkedIn connections. The more first degree connections you have, the more second and third degree connections you’ll have. And, it will be easier to find people at the new company you’re interested in.

5. You don’t have enough recommendations. The recommendations on your LinkedIn profile can be incredibly powerful. Your former boss and coworkers can leave you positive feedback – for everyone to see. It shows that you’re someone they would hire again. If you’ve been laid off in the past, the recommendations section can show a future employer that you were a valued employee. Don’t overlook this section. It can add a tremendous amount of value to your resume.

6. You aren’t participating. LinkedIn isn’t just a place to upload your resume. It’s a place to connect with others. It’s a place to join and participate in groups. It’s a great place to join into professional discussions. Don’t take a backseat when it comes to your participation on LinkedIn. This is the time to get involved.

LinkedIn is a critical piece of the 2019 job search. Before you start, review your profile. Updating your profile will help you to start your 2019 job search off strong.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

183 | LinkedIn & Job Searching | Dan Shapero, Dan is the Vice President of Talent Solutions, Careers & Learning at LinkedIn

Episode 183 is live! This week, we talk with Dan Shapero in Anaheim, California.

Dan is the Vice President of Talent Solutions, Careers & Learning at LinkedIn.

On today’s episode, Dan shares:

  • Exciting news about LinkedIn’s acquisition of employee engagement platform Glint and what it could mean for your workplace
  • Tips on using LinkedIn when you’re a job seeker
  • An answer to the important question: Should you accept connection requests from people you don’t know on LinkedIn

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about LinkedIn and Dan’s work, check out the LinkedIn website: https://www.linkedin.com.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find the show!

LinkedIn Focuses on Employee Engagement

I recently had the opportunity to attend LinkedIn’s annual human resources event: Talent Connect. Held in Anaheim, California, the event showcased everything LinkedIn’s been working on in 2018, and their plans for the future. It’s always a great educational event. The information presented ranged from what they’re doing for job seekers with their applicant tracking system — to how they’re helping companies to expand their online learning systems with LinkedIn Learning (formerly known as Lynda.com). They also announced the acquisition of an employee engagement platform: Glint.

Dan Shapero, Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn, announced the purchase on stage, alongside Glint CEO, Jim Barnett. Glint’s mission is to “help people be happier and more successful at work.” The technology is expected to help answer tough HR questions, including: the overall health and performance of the organization, where to find new talent, and if the capabilities of the team are aligned to the business needs.

“With LinkedIn’s insights into the larger workforce alongside Glint’s internal view into employee engagement and skills, we will be able to help talent leaders answer all those difficult questions,” said Shapero. “Glint provides executives with the tools to answer questions about the health and happiness of the talent they have, while giving managers at all levels the access and insight they need to improve.”

Glint’s technology encourages companies to regularly gather employee feedback on work, culture, and leadership. And, it provides those insights back to the leadership team to make informed decisions. This is great news for employees and managers alike.

After all, replacing employees is expensive. And so often, employees aren’t leaving to make more money. They’re leaving because they’re unhappy, or they want more career growth. A solution like Glint may help companies to solve these problems for employees before it’s too late.

As I think back on my experience at LinkedIn Talent Connect, there’s one theme that really shines through. It’s undeniable just how integrated LinkedIn is becoming into each and every one of our professional lives – from the beginning to the end.

Ten years ago, LinkedIn was a simple networking website. Today, it’s a collection of technologies that travel with us through our entire career journey. We use LinkedIn to research where we want to work using their company reviews. We monitor and apply for jobs on LinkedIn. We estimate how much money we should be making using LinkedIn Salary. Once we’re working at a company, we stay in touch with our colleagues there. We use LinkedIn for referrals and references. We use the site as a continuing education resource. We even throw away our business cards because we know we can use LinkedIn instead.

And now, companies are using LinkedIn to find out how they can be better employers for their employees. Regardless of where you are in your career journey, one thing’s for sure. LinkedIn is likely a part of your everyday professional life.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

164 | Diversity & Inclusion – Mark Lobosco, Vice President of Talent Solutions, LinkedIn, San Francisco, CA

Episode 164 is live! This week, we talk with Mark Lobosco in San Francisco, California.

Mark is the Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn. He’s responsible for leading the global pre-sales, sales and customer success teams for LinkedIn’s Talent Solutions business. Mark also sponsors a number of company-wide Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging initiatives and is the executive sponsor of HOLA, LinkedIn’s Latin employee resource group.

I’m excited to invite Mark onto the show today to talk about diversity in today’s workplace. There are so many important discussions going on around diversity right now, that include issues including race, gender, age, disabilities, and more.

We are also commemorating the 50th year of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy this month, so this is an important time to have this conversation. With these things in mind, LinkedIn recently released its report on 2018 Global recruiting trends. We will dig into LinkedIn’s findings and why they are important.

On today’s episode, Mark shares:

  • The differences between diversity, inclusion, and belonging
  • Why companies are increasing their focus on diversity
  • How to identify companies that are diverse and inclusive when you’re job seeking
  • Predictions on how diversity will continue to evolve in the workplace

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also find it in Amazon Alexa as a new Alexa Skill!

To learn more about Mark and LinkedIn, visit LinkedIn.com at https://www.linkedin.com/in/marklobosco/.

Thanks to everyone for listening! And, thank you to those who sent me questions. You can send me your questions to Angela@CopelandCoaching.com. You can also send me questions via Twitter. I’m @CopelandCoach. And, on Facebook, I am Copeland Coaching.

Don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave me a review!