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183 | LinkedIn & Job Searching | Dan Shapero, Dan is the Vice President of Talent Solutions, Careers & Learning at LinkedIn

Episode 183 is live! This week, we talk with Dan Shapero in Anaheim, California.

Dan is the Vice President of Talent Solutions, Careers & Learning at LinkedIn.

On today’s episode, Dan shares:

  • Exciting news about LinkedIn’s acquisition of employee engagement platform Glint and what it could mean for your workplace
  • Tips on using LinkedIn when you’re a job seeker
  • An answer to the important question: Should you accept connection requests from people you don’t know on LinkedIn

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about LinkedIn and Dan’s work, check out the LinkedIn website: https://www.linkedin.com.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find the show!

LinkedIn Focuses on Employee Engagement

I recently had the opportunity to attend LinkedIn’s annual human resources event: Talent Connect. Held in Anaheim, California, the event showcased everything LinkedIn’s been working on in 2018, and their plans for the future. It’s always a great educational event. The information presented ranged from what they’re doing for job seekers with their applicant tracking system — to how they’re helping companies to expand their online learning systems with LinkedIn Learning (formerly known as Lynda.com). They also announced the acquisition of an employee engagement platform: Glint.

Dan Shapero, Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn, announced the purchase on stage, alongside Glint CEO, Jim Barnett. Glint’s mission is to “help people be happier and more successful at work.” The technology is expected to help answer tough HR questions, including: the overall health and performance of the organization, where to find new talent, and if the capabilities of the team are aligned to the business needs.

“With LinkedIn’s insights into the larger workforce alongside Glint’s internal view into employee engagement and skills, we will be able to help talent leaders answer all those difficult questions,” said Shapero. “Glint provides executives with the tools to answer questions about the health and happiness of the talent they have, while giving managers at all levels the access and insight they need to improve.”

Glint’s technology encourages companies to regularly gather employee feedback on work, culture, and leadership. And, it provides those insights back to the leadership team to make informed decisions. This is great news for employees and managers alike.

After all, replacing employees is expensive. And so often, employees aren’t leaving to make more money. They’re leaving because they’re unhappy, or they want more career growth. A solution like Glint may help companies to solve these problems for employees before it’s too late.

As I think back on my experience at LinkedIn Talent Connect, there’s one theme that really shines through. It’s undeniable just how integrated LinkedIn is becoming into each and every one of our professional lives – from the beginning to the end.

Ten years ago, LinkedIn was a simple networking website. Today, it’s a collection of technologies that travel with us through our entire career journey. We use LinkedIn to research where we want to work using their company reviews. We monitor and apply for jobs on LinkedIn. We estimate how much money we should be making using LinkedIn Salary. Once we’re working at a company, we stay in touch with our colleagues there. We use LinkedIn for referrals and references. We use the site as a continuing education resource. We even throw away our business cards because we know we can use LinkedIn instead.

And now, companies are using LinkedIn to find out how they can be better employers for their employees. Regardless of where you are in your career journey, one thing’s for sure. LinkedIn is likely a part of your everyday professional life.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

164 | Diversity & Inclusion – Mark Lobosco, Vice President of Talent Solutions, LinkedIn, San Francisco, CA

Episode 164 is live! This week, we talk with Mark Lobosco in San Francisco, California.

Mark is the Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn. He’s responsible for leading the global pre-sales, sales and customer success teams for LinkedIn’s Talent Solutions business. Mark also sponsors a number of company-wide Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging initiatives and is the executive sponsor of HOLA, LinkedIn’s Latin employee resource group.

I’m excited to invite Mark onto the show today to talk about diversity in today’s workplace. There are so many important discussions going on around diversity right now, that include issues including race, gender, age, disabilities, and more.

We are also commemorating the 50th year of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy this month, so this is an important time to have this conversation. With these things in mind, LinkedIn recently released its report on 2018 Global recruiting trends. We will dig into LinkedIn’s findings and why they are important.

On today’s episode, Mark shares:

  • The differences between diversity, inclusion, and belonging
  • Why companies are increasing their focus on diversity
  • How to identify companies that are diverse and inclusive when you’re job seeking
  • Predictions on how diversity will continue to evolve in the workplace

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also find it in Amazon Alexa as a new Alexa Skill!

To learn more about Mark and LinkedIn, visit LinkedIn.com at https://www.linkedin.com/in/marklobosco/.

Thanks to everyone for listening! And, thank you to those who sent me questions. You can send me your questions to Angela@CopelandCoaching.com. You can also send me questions via Twitter. I’m @CopelandCoach. And, on Facebook, I am Copeland Coaching.

Don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave me a review!

 

Do your salary research!

salary research
You know that negotiation is one of my favorite things – especially when you’re switching companies! A job transition is the perfect time to negotiate your salary up. When it comes to a successful salary negotiation, one of the most important things you can do is salary research. Take the time to find out what a competitive salary is for your new role, and for particular companies.

Especially in the corporate world, different companies pay very differently for the same position. Even within a company, pay can vary significantly. Companies use pay bands to determine how much employees may make. It may not sound like a big deal, but some positions have pay bands that span a range of $50K or more. In theory, you will be paid more for more experience and more education. In reality, these things do matter – but, so does your ability to negotiate.

You may wonder where to begin your salary research. There are many different sources online where you can do salary research – too many to cover here. I will touch on just a few that will be the best sources of information for beginning your salary researchincluding a new way to research salary that rolls out later this week!

Glassdoor.com

Glassdoor has two options for salary research. The first is researching what a particular company pays for a certain role. In other words, search for a company that you like – by name. Then, enter a location (or you can leave location blank) and select the dropdown for “Salary.”

This simple search will give you a list of different roles at the company, and the pay range for each. You should search through the list to find jobs that are the most similar to the one you hope to interview for. Notice that each job will have both a pay range (shown as min and max), and the number of people who have reported their salary. Glassdoor provides self-reported data, so the data coming out is only as good as the data going in. Honestly though, the data going in appears to be pretty solid.
Their second option for salary research is a tool called the Know Your Worth Tool. It allows you to track your value over time, compared to the others in your area.

Salary.com

Salary.com has been around for years, but still provides basic salary information that can be helpful to your search. The site allows you to search by job title and city or zip code.

It provides a bell curve that will share with you what people with your title are making on average – and at the top and bottom ends of the curve. You can also compare base salary to base and bonus.

Because Salary.com isn’t industry or company specific, the data provided can be a bit vague, but I would argue that it’s still a decent data point to collect during your salary research.

Indeed.com

You may never have thought much about it before, but Indeed also offers salary data. When you visit their site, click the “Find Salaries” tab. You will be taken to a screen where you can search by job title or company. If you search by job title, you’re taken to a second screen where you can narrow down your results by city and company. If you search by company, you will be taken to a screen where you can narrow it down based on job title within that company. Indeed provides a range, similar to both Glassdoor.com and Salary.com.

LinkedIn.com

Today, you can find estimated salaries on LinkedIn by clicking on the “Jobs” tab and then clicking the link for “LinkedIn Salary.” You can search both by job title and by city. LinkedIn provides a range for both median base salary and median total compensation. And, you can narrow the results down by industry and years of experience.

But, even better than this — LinkedIn is adding a new feature to their site this week that will allow you to access the salary for a specific job posting you’re interested in. They want to help bring more transparency to conversations about salary. You know that I love this.

Here’s how the new “Salary Insights” will work. For many (but not all) jobs, you will begin to see a salary for each job posting. It will be listed as either “Expected” salary or “Estimated” salary. Expected is the salary that is provided by the company. Expected salary is LinkedIn’s estimate based on other data they have that matches the title, company, and location.

This new feature goes live later this week. Try it, and let me know what you think! I’m so excited to see increased pay transparency as part of the application process.

LinkedIn releases estimated salary for salary research

Salary Research Summary

Your ability to negotiate for the best salary will be determined by the hard work you put in to research what you’re worth. But, lucky for all of us, this process is getting easier and easier! The more salary research you do, the more likely you are to be able to ask for what’s fair. And, that’s all we really need, right? To be paid fairly, and to be treated with respect – those two things are key!

Good luck with your salary research! Let me know what you think about these methods.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

The Secret to Using LinkedIn Effectively

There’s a question that many new job seekers are thinking about. “Do I really need to use Linkedin, and how can I use it effectively?”

The first answer is straightforward. Yes, you need to use LinkedIn. You need to use it for your job search. And, honestly, you need to use it before your job search. It should be part of your professional brand – similar to carrying a business card. Integrating LinkedIn into your daily business practice will make it both easier and more effective in the long run.

So, the next question is around how to use LinkedIn effectively. Sometimes, people ask me if there’s a course they can take. And actually, I do teach a workshop about LinkedIn. But in reality, you don’t need a special class to use LinkedIn.

The main thing you need to do to become good at LinkedIn is use LinkedIn. You heard me right. Use it. It’s like Facebook. If you only looked at Facebook every six months, you might wonder how it works. It would be a bit unclear how to find your friends or how to accept party invitations. But, if you’re like most people, you use Facebook every day. And, after a while, it becomes second nature.

So, where to begin? First, you need a profile picture. I get it. You may not really like putting up photos of yourself. You may not have a recent photo you like. I totally hear you. But, in order to use LinkedIn effectively, you’ve gotta do it. Don’t feel like you need to hire a professional photographer. A friend could even take a decent photo on your smartphone. Just be sure that you look professional and the photo is only you. Ideally, you want to smile.

Next, fill out your profile. Put in as much information as you can. Include a mini-bio of yourself in the Summary section. Include your jobs in the Experience section, along with detail about what you did. Include your degrees (but omit the year you graduated). Fill it out – all of it.

Then, ask your trusted contacts to leave reviews of your work under the Recommendations section.

If you’re really feeling ambitious, turn on the “open candidate” feature. This is where you let recruiters now that you’re open for new jobs. It’s also a place where you can leave notes for recruiters about your dream job, including desired job titles, locations, and industries.

Now, get out there and use LinkedIn. Follow companies, participate in discussions, share articles, connect to colleagues and yes – do consider connecting to someone you don’t already know in real life. After all, how are you going to meet new people if you don’t meet new people?

That’s it. Just like Facebook, the more you use LinkedIn, the easier it gets. The more intuitive it becomes. The more aware of little features you become. It’s just that simple.

Remember, don’t put information on LinkedIn that you wouldn’t want your boss to see. Don’t share confidential company stats. And, definitely don’t SAY that you are looking for a job.

There’s no secret to it. Well, except maybe this one. The secret to using LinkedIn is to use LinkedIn. :c)

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

LinkedIn Shapes the Future of Hiring

Job searching today can often feel like talking to a brick wall. You apply online, alongside hundreds of other job seekers. Despite how qualified you may be, you rarely hear back from the company. The rejection is tough. It may feel like it’s just you, but it’s not. You know how hard it is to get in to an Ivy League college? Well, it’s even harder to land a job by applying online.

Given the number of times we’re all switching jobs today, this repeat experience is frustrating. Online company LinkedIn is using data to tackle the frustration of both the job seeker, and the hiring manager. Their latest products were announced at LinkedIn Talent Connect in Nashville, Tennessee in October. Talent Connect attracted over 4K human resources managers and recruiters from over 2K companies around the world.

Kate Hastings, Head of Global Insights at LinkedIn, started her product announcement with, “I’m Kate Hastings, and I’m obsessed with data!” And, it seems that the rest of the LinkedIn team is too. Dan Shapero, VP of Talent Solutions and Careers said, “Data is the corporate superpower.”

How will companies use your data in the future?

Job seekers are able to share whether or not they’re open to new opportunities on the LinkedIn platform. They’re able to provide this information in a confidential way that is not revealed to their current employer. In other words, they won’t show up if their company’s recruiter is looking for new candidates. They’re also able to communicate other preferences, including whether or not they’re willing to relocate to another city.

Companies will filter more

One of the headaches employers face is the sheer number of applications they receive for any one job posting. To help cut down on the clutter, the human resources manager is able to sort by employment type (full-time, part-time, contract, or internship) and specific job skills. They’re also able to specify the preferred number of years of experience of a candidate. And, they can find out whether or not a particular applicant is authorized to work in the country where they’re applying.

Fast tracking the best candidates

In addition to the filtering options that are available to the recruiter, the candidate experience will also be improved. LinkedIn wants to help human resources managers to identify the best talent quickly, and to give highly desirable candidates a VIP experience. Rather than make a great candidate go through the entire application process, they may fast track them to a lunch with the hiring manager. Or, they may allow the best candidates to send messages directly to the hiring manager via LinkedIn.

The unconventional candidate

Although the experience should greatly improve for the best candidates, these changes bring up questions for unconventional candidates. What about someone who’s switching careers midstream, or learned their trade outside of a fancy college? Ultimately, those candidates may be even less likely to show up on the hiring manager’s radar if they don’t meet the basic requirements.

But, in reality, this isn’t a new problem. When someone is trying to switch careers, the best route is often to search the old fashioned way – by networking. And, the good news is, LinkedIn can be a useful tool for that.

The job market is continuing to change at a rapid pace – almost just as fast as we’re all changing careers. Whether we like it or not, the reality is that much of the job search game is now being played online. The best way to win is to jump in and give it a shot.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach