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Interviewing for Successful Outcomes

With unemployment still relatively low, employers are continuing to struggle to find and retain great talent. The huge jumps in inflation, and the changing landscape of work, are incentivizing employees to consider switching jobs. Employees are prioritizing themselves and their quality of life more than in the past. With this backdrop, it continues to be surprising that many employers have not updated their hiring practices.

Did you know that for certain jobs, employers expect candidates to go through up to ten rounds of interviews? Many companies use testing as part of their interview process. Some ask candidates to do unpaid work as part of the interview process. And, many employers are taking months to make a hiring decision.

These same employers are blown away when a candidate turns down their job offer, or walks away midway through the process. But, what do they expect? Job seekers are being discerning, and they expect to receive the same level of respect that they’re giving.

For example, it’s not uncommon for an employer to ask a candidate to reschedule an interview at the last moment due to a conflict. But, if the candidate asks to reschedule an interview, they will most likely never hear back again. This is unfortunate, considering the candidate secretly interviewing while they’re working at their current job.

Many interviewers will grill candidates to try to squeeze them during the interview. In many cases, this is to see how the candidate responds under pressure. But, rather than simply getting a read on the candidate, the candidate is also getting a read on the company. They will walk away remembering what a negative experience it was to interview at the company.

Employers are also continuing to leave candidates in the dark for weeks or months during the hiring process. It is expected that the candidate will patiently wait until the company is ready. In reality, the candidate is moving on. They will keep interviewing at other companies until they find one that truly values their time.

When you’re the hiring manager, you want to have the control to pick the very best candidate you can find. But, when you treat a candidate in a less than desirable way, you’re giving up that control. The only candidate who will be interested in your job is the desperate one.

So, what should a hiring manager do if they want their pick? Be quick. Take weeks to make a hiring decision, not months. Be clear with your communication. Meet when you commit to meeting. Do not put the candidate through never ending rounds of interviews. And, don’t grill candidates as if they’re lucky to be talking to you.

Interviewing has become a two way street. If you want to hire the best candidates, you have to give them the best hiring experience. Otherwise, they’ll find someone who will. Candidates have choices, and they aren’t making decisions solely based on factors like money.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

The Importance of Leadership

Remote work is a perk that has exploded since the pandemic began. Prior to 2020, a remote job was a unique find. Today, it has become the norm for many jobs. But, working from home has introduced challenges related to human connection. And, leadership has never been more important.

It’s funny. Prior to the pandemic, I knew much more about my coworkers, and I bet you did too. I had seen photos of their families. I knew the kinds of cars they drove. I had a good sense if they were morning people, and whether or not they liked coffee. These are details you learn in person.

Remotely, these details are lost. And, so is the connection. Many interactions become far more transactional than before. Gone are the days of chatting over your cube wall to the person next to you. Gone are the watercooler chats.

The other area that has changed is how we interact with our leaders. In the past, it was not unusual to talk with your manager at least once a day. You’d likely have a one-on-one meeting once a week. You would also see them in other scheduled meetings. But, even more importantly, you’d have casual conversations.

The casual conversations were the most important ones. They were the ones where creative ideas would come together. They were the times you would work together to solve big problems that popped up. And, most importantly, it’s where you’d build a real relationship with them. You might learn about their family, and they’d learn about yours. You’d become work friends in a way. These sort of interactions are where mutual trust and respect are formed. It’s where loyalty and common purpose are developed.

Trust and respect are the foundation of any good working relationship. They’re the reason why you keep getting your job done, even when the boss isn’t looking over your shoulder. It’s why your boss can count on you to keep the lights on while they’re on vacation.

But, what happens when these personal interactions begin to dwindle? What happens when the personal relationship fades away? I would argue that work becomes more transactional. Work becomes something you are simply bartering your time for in exchange for a paycheck. And, like any consumer in a store, you’ll looking for the best deal. You’ll want to put in the least amount of effort for the most amount of money.

To the leaders who aren’t taking the time to connect to your team, their work is suffering. It may not be clear today, but someday this pattern will catch up with you. They may be producing less work than they could. They may be producing lower quality work. Or, they may have no hesitation to leave when another job opportunity arises.

Remote work requires you to do more than to control those who work for you. It requires you to lead – more now than ever before.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Congratulations College Graduates

This is a big month. Graduates are emerging from college after spending over two years in a pandemic. Can you imagine what it would have been like to spend your junior and senior years of college being isolated and learning via Zoom? I can’t. Hats off to the graduates who have pulled through this tough time.

It’s now time to find and embark on a new job! For most people, this is both an exciting and scary time. You may feel completely confused, as if you’re on an island with no roadmap.

The first step is, get started on your job search now. I’m sure you’ve seen the news about the strong job market, and the Great Resignation. Do not assume that it will be simple to find a job. Job searching is hard. It can take a very long time.

Start looking now, and enlist a few job searching friends as support. You need people who are going through the same experience to talk to. You’ll have interviews fall apart at the end of the process. Jobs will be put on hold. Companies will ghost you. It’s a lot like dating. You’re going to have to kiss a lot of frogs.

When you find something, do your homework on what the current market is paying. But, keep your expectations realistic. As a recent graduate, you will likely be paid on the low end of hiring scales. I know this is frustrating, especially given the high cost of apartments. But, your hard work will pay off. Look for the job that will provide you the best experience and the money will come (later).

Remember that you are only the third group of college graduates to enter the workforce since the start of the pandemic. If you’re working remotely, there are many advantages. But, companies are still learning how to work with their remote employees. And, they are certainly not used to working with young college graduates remotely. If career success is important to you, you’re going to have to work to be more proactive than your older peers.

Look for mentors, look for friends, and work to build a great relationship with your boss. In the remote world, it’s easy to become disconnected. You need to work to create opportunities to learn and grow. You need to create a community for yourself.

Ask your boss to meet with you at least once per week for one-on-one meetings. Setup coffee meetings with your peers. And, look for others within the organization to build bonds with. Talk about work, and then look for opportunities to talk beyond work. Friendships at work is where the real growth happens.

Last but not least, hold yourself accountable. Your career is up to you. Set regular hours, and put in the time – even when no one is looking. The foundation you lay now will help you for years to come. Congratulations, and good luck!

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Respect in a flat world

The world of work seems a little flatter now than it did just a few years ago. Zoom meetings have created a phenomenon. And, I’m not talking about the fact that we’re using a new technology. It’s flattened our relationships.

It reminds me of the military. Whether you’re in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or Air Force, when in uniform, there are clear signals about who is who. You can tell which branch of the military someone is in. And, you can see what rank they hold. There is a system that is used to navigate the social work structure within the military. But, without a uniform, it is much harder to guess these details.

In a similar way, working from home has taken away many of the social cues that are normally present in the workplace. It is now difficult to see which designer shoes or clothes someone is wearing. And, in fact, the entire team may have switched to comfortable clothes for the day to day.

Working from home and Zoom also take away some of the hierarchy present at in person meetings. Executives are no longer trying to snag the most influential seat at the conference room table. Video meetings also create a structure where people are more easily able to speak up. And, forget status symbols such as cufflinks.

For remote workers, there are also no longer bigger offices for people with bigger job titles. In other words, everyone is a little more equal. We are all individual people who are working at our individual jobs.

There are many positives that come along with a flatter working world. But, with every positive, there are also challenges. For example, a flatter organization also means that people will interact with one another at all levels. The normal hierarchy is less clear.

You’ll likely engage with colleagues who are both at higher and lower levels than ever before. It may be unclear what age they are, or how senior their roles are. But one thing is for sure. Each and every person should be treated with respect. This is such a key to working well as a virtual team.

Have you ever noticed that people sometimes change their behavior online? For example, some people are more comfortable being rude to others on Facebook and Twitter. The same can be said for remote work. In addition to a flatter organization, relationships are shallower. When is the last time you had a deep conversation with a colleague? Do you know how many children your coworkers have? When is the last time you had lunch with anyone from your work?

The less that we know one another, and the more we’re interacting across the company, the more likely tension is to build. If you find yourself in this situation, try to remember this. We’re all part of one team. We should work together, rather than against one another – for common goals.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Managing Your Burnout

Burnout at work is real, and it’s happening more now than ever. This may be due to the high stress and change we have faced over the last two years. I heard from a reader this week who is experiencing burnout in the workplace, as you may be too. The most important part of the burnout experience is how you manage it.

For many people, the urge is to quit their current job. The thought of one more painful day at the office is the last thing you want to think about. Quitting sounds gratifying. You can take time off to relax, before walking in to a better, higher paying job. The job market is hot now, right? This sounds easy.

But, if you’re like most people, your job helps to pay your bills. You may be okay without income for a period of time, but eventually, you’ll need that steady paycheck again. When someone quits working, they picture that it will be very relaxing. However, for most people, it’s just the opposite. Until you have a new job, you’re often on edge, wondering when the job search will be over. This experience is compounded by loved ones who will ask how the search is going.

The most relaxing time off is between jobs. When you find a new job, set your start date far enough out that you may have time in between. This will be the most relaxing time you’ll have. You’ll be free from work, and you’ll be free from worry.

Most people don’t quit jobs before they’ve found another job. When you go to a job interview, quitting is a difficult thing to explain to your future hiring manager. They may very well assume that you were fired from your last job, or best case scenario, they may assume that you’re a poor decision maker.

In addition, when you have no job and you’re interviewing, you feel more pressure to accept a job offer. For example, if it has been three months since you left your last job, you may feel panicked. You’re running out of money, and you wonder what another three months with no job might look like. This can push you to take the next job offer, even if it pays less or seems to be a bad work situation. In other words, if you feel pressured to take something, you may end up in a worse situation than you are in today.

Take control of how you want to handle your burnout. If it’s time to find a new job, great! If you feel that you are too busy or too stressed to look for another job, consider your options. If you have vacation saved up, this can be a great time to use it. Take time off to apply for jobs and recharge. Focus on your search, so you can create a positive path out as quickly as possible.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach