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Ghosting: The dating phenomenon hitting the job search world

The number of companies reporting job search candidates ghosting them is on the rise. Ghosting is a term typically used in dating. It happens when you’ve been dating and one of the people stops responding to all communication with no reasons as to why. They may suddenly stop returning calls, texts, or emails. It’s as if they disappear.

In the past, companies did this to candidates without thinking about it. The job seeker would put in many hours for interviews and preparation. Then, the company would decide it wasn’t a good fit and would drop the candidate.

What goes around comes around it seems. Now that the job market is improving, candidates are dishing this same approach back at employers. Companies are reporting that job seekers are bailing on scheduled interviews. And, after accepting job offers, they aren’t showing up to their first day. Some companies are reporting that existing employees are quitting with no notice. They just don’t come back.

One NBC report estimated that 20 to 50 percent of job applicants and workers are ghosting their employers. So, what’s a company to do about this? The job market is tight, and companies still need to hire.

First and foremost, treat those you’re interviewing the way you’d want to be treated: with respect. Proactive job searching is hard. It’s an emotionally painful process. If you’ve ever been without a job, you know how it feels.

Be transparent. If you already have someone in mind to hire, don’t lead a candidate on needlessly. If you are putting the position on hold, tell them. If the candidate isn’t the right fit, let them know. And, if you aren’t sure when you plan to call them back, be honest.

Last, you’re building a relationship with everyone you interview. Just because they’re not a good fit for this job doesn’t mean they won’t be a fit for a job in the future. And, they may know someone who is a fit. If you work to build a relationship with each person, even if it’s just as a LinkedIn connection, you’ll increase the chances of being a company that people want to work for.

I speak to executives every day who are looking for a new job. They’re shocked at how long it can take. They can’t believe how hard the rejection can be. And, they are often completely unprepared for how out of control they feel through the process. It can be like driving a car that has no brakes.

If you’re a company that’s experiencing candidate ghosting, it’s time to look in the mirror. Are you the kind of place employees want to work? How do you treat the candidates you interview?

The cutthroat approach to business worked, when the market was tough for job seekers. But, now that job seekers are back in the driver’s seat, a new game plan is required to win the best talent.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

When are we going to close down the open office?

I hear from job seekers every day. They’ve been searching for a new job for ages. When they finally land it, they have a concern that’s not about money. It’s their office setup.

For years, open style offices have been all the rage. Whether it’s shared cubicles or a big open room, companies are still hanging onto this concept. Many managers say the environment will foster collaboration and connection. The problem is, collaboration and connection don’t seem to be an issue with those who have offices.

In reality, companies are trying to save money on real estate. And, the employees are the ones who pay the price.

Study after study has confirmed that an open office environment reduces productivity. The BBC found that 70% of US companies are using open offices. Yet, they decrease productivity by at least 15%. In fact, studies show that open office environments also increase sick days at a company. These offices are costing the company valuable time and money.

Chances are, I’m preaching to the choir. I’ve never spoken to a single person who actually likes working in an open office. So, what’s the answer to this problem? If an open office is causing us to be less productive, less happy, and more sick, what can be done?

Companies could go back to the model of having offices with doors, but that’s the most expensive option. A cheaper strategy would be to switch back to tall cubicles that provide more privacy. But, this is also expensive as it can take up valuable real estate.

With these problems in mind, it seems like the ultimate compromise would be more remote worker jobs. In other words, allow employees to work from the comfort of their homes. I know, it sounds a little out there if it’s something you haven’t tried. It can take a little getting used to.

But, Harvard Business Review shared a study where employees were allowed to work from home. They were more productive, happier, and less likely to quit their jobs. And, the company saved $1,900 per employee on office furniture and space.

Remote work has been a trendy conversation topic for some time. A handful of companies are doing it. But, it would be great for companies to begin trying it in large volumes. When an entire department works remotely, one person isn’t left out. Everyone learns to work together in this way.

In addition, remote work would allow workers to redistribute themselves across the country to areas that were the best fit for them and their families. For example, someone working in Silicon Valley may want to relocate to a cheaper city that is closer to family. Vermont is currently offering remote workers a $10,000 incentive to relocate to their state.

Today, companies should revisit their office strategy. It would improve productivity, reduce costs, and give them a broader choice of excellent employees to pick from.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

It’s summer! How are you going to use your vacation?

A good vacation can be one of the most relaxing things you can do for yourself. Whether you prefer the beach, camping, or grilling out in your backyard, down time is something we all need. Unfortunately, we’re not all getting this much needed time to relax. Can you relate?

In the United States, there’s no minimum vacation or holidays that companies are required to provide to workers. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics finds that 77% of employers offer paid vacation time. On average, employers give ten days of vacation after one year of employment. The number of vacation days grows based upon tenure. After twenty years, most employees receive twenty days of vacation. In addition to vacation, many companies offer holidays.

It’s interesting to compare our vacation to other places. In France, employees are granted a minimum of five weeks of vacation. In Australia, the minimum is four weeks. In Belgium, the minimum is twenty-four days. In Denmark, the minimum is five weeks. Now, it’s not to say that there aren’t other countries with smaller vacations. In some areas of Canada, the minimum is ten days, for example.

But, what are we really doing with our two weeks of vacation? You probably guessed it. In many cases, not much. I recently heard an interesting term, “vacation shaming.” It’s an all too familiar idea where employers place negative feelings and shame around the idea of taking time off.

This vacation shaming causes us to feel uncomfortable requesting time away. Despite receiving two weeks of vacation each year, many Americans are only taking about half of it, according to a survey conducted by Glassdoor.com.

Even if we are taking vacation time, many of us are staying plugged in. We answer emails, take phone calls, and sometimes attend meetings remotely. There’s a fear of getting into trouble and losing our job while we’re out.

For employees who do choose to take vacation, some companies set rules that limit the options available. For example, a company may have a policy that an employee may not take more than four or five consecutive days in a row. For those with an international destination in mind, this can really limit the options.

Being successful at work if often tied to being the best version of yourself that you can be. And, that requires you to take care of yourself. Vacation is a great place to start on this goal.

If you’re looking for a new job, do your best to learn about the company’s policy about taking vacation, both official and unofficial. Many online review sites can provide an employee perspective.

Then, don’t forget that vacation time is negotiable – just like salary. When you negotiate your offer letter, know that you can ask for additional time off.

In the long run, taking time for yourself is more important than any amount of vacation shaming. We all need a break sometimes.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

Do you ever feel like you’re struggling to take your career to the next level? If so, you’re not alone. Many of the job seekers I speak to each day are struggling with similar feelings. They have not received the achievements they expected to get by now. Perhaps they’re coming up on an important birthday, such as thirty or forty or fifty. They haven’t received the awards they would have hoped, or the plum promotion they were counting on. They’re making less money than they had planned for.

Often, they see peers and friends who are making more, and are going up the corporate ladder faster. It can be upsetting, especially if the job seeker was a top performer in school, is a hard worker, and is intelligent.

I recently had the opportunity to speak to Dr. Prasad Kaipa from San Francisco, California. Prasad is the author of the book From Smart To Wise. He focuses on helping professionals to “ignite the genius within” and to connect with their noble purpose.

This is quite a lot to digest. So, let’s focus on one piece of the discussion. One of the things that resonated with me was this idea. “What got us here won’t get us there.” Dr. Kaipa shared the concept that your situation changes over time. He tied this back to the idea of a core competence. Very often, we are promoted through our careers because we have a core strength or set of core strengths that we rely on. But, as we go up the ladder, a different skillset is needed for each role.

Dr. Kaipa explained, “In time, we need to develop a second capability. We need to be able to develop a second core strength. Now that we are in the current position, even though the current set of skills helped us to get here, now that you are a Vice President, you need to learn how to become a President.”

Dr. Kaipa continued, “The unfortunate part is, whenever we feel we are not reaching our potential, we use the same set of skills that got us here, harder and more often. We don’t really reexamine whether the strength that we have that has become our signature strength has become the nail in our foot. I think that kind of a pausing, reexamining, and getting reflection both internally and from other people is what gets us to where we want to go.”

This makes a lot of sense. When we feel like we are failing at something, it’s possible that we’ve outgrown our old toolkit. It’s possible that new strengths are needed. And, sometimes we don’t even know yet what those strengths may be.

If you are struggling to reach your full potential and would like to hear the full interview with Dr. Kaipa, you can find it on the Copeland Coaching Podcast, and download it for free on Apple Podcasts.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Glassdoor Announces 2018 Top CEOs

It’s often said that employees don’t quit jobs. They quit bosses. Can you relate? If you’ve ever left a job, there’s a good chance you might agree with this idea.

If you’re looking for a new job, one of the first things to consider is the management you’ll be working for. I often believe that finding the right environment is just as important (if not more so) than finding the perfect title.

Glassdoor recently released their 2018 Top CEOs list. The list is created based on anonymous U.S. employee feedback received on Glassdoor.com between May of 2017 and May of 2018.

A company CEO sets the direction of the company, and influences the managers below them. It’s safe to stay the CEO is a great place to start when you’re thinking of where you may want to apply next.

The number one spot this year was taken by Zoom Video Communications’ CEO Eric S. Yuan. Yuan has an impressive 99% approval rating. The top five spots are filled by Michael F. Mahoney at Boston Scientific (99% approval), Daniel Springer at DocuSign (99% approval), Lynsi Snyder at In-N-Out Burger (99% approval), and James Downing at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (98% approval).

Four CEOs have made the Glassdoor Top CEOs list for six years in a row, including Marc Benioff at Salesforce (#10 with 97% approval), Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook (#16 with 96% approval), Lloyd C. Blankfein at Goldman Sachs (#77 with 92% approval), and Tim Cook at Apple (#96 with 91% approval).

These A-ratings are very impressive compared to the average CEO approval rating of 69% for all CEOs.

Zoom Video Communication’s CEO Eric S. Yuan shared his philosophy on the kind of company he wants to create for his employees. “I need to make sure I’m happy, and that my employees are happy. Asking myself that question, I realized if I’m not happy, my kids, my family will be impacted. Our employees will also be impacted. So that’s why our company culture is to deliver happiness. It’s personal to our company’s values. We’re going to care about each other, really focus on delivering happiness to each other. Ultimately, as a company, we deliver happiness to our customers.”

If you’re job seeking, you know that finding a job that fits both inside and outside of work is key. Unhappiness is like a domino. If things aren’t going well at work, chances are that they are going to follow you home to another area.

As you’re job searching, keep this in mind. Don’t simply look for the best title or the most money. Look for a great, healthy company. Very often, that starts with the CEO. Check out the entire 2018 Glassdoor Top CEOs list to learn more about the top 100 CEOs who made the cut. And, check out the company reviews on Glassdoor for even more information about how employees feel about their workplace.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Creating Career Independence

I hope you have a wonderful holiday week! I know I’m looking forward to spending time with friends, grilling out, and watching fireworks to celebrate this Independence Day. This holiday is also a great time to reflect on your career.

Are you feeling happy, or is something missing? If you’ve been thinking of making a change, this could be the perfect time. But, finding a job can take months. If you want to make a change, it’s important to get started before the winter holidays begin to approach.

Often, one of the sources of job frustration can be a lack of control. Whether you’re not doing the kind of work you enjoy, don’t like your boss, or are underpaid, you may feel helpless. It’s this helpless feeling that can really impact you each day as you go in. It can make your day seem longer, and tasks seem harder.

Finding career independence starts with identifying what is within your radius of control. What can you do today that will help you to gain more freedom tomorrow?

First, I recommend keeping your resume up to date at all times. You’ll be prepared, and you won’t forget important details later. On top of that, keep your LinkedIn current and connect to your colleagues. You never know when things could change.

If you’re not using your favorite skills at work, look for ways to keep your expertise up to date. Consider taking on small consulting projects, or volunteer at a non-profit. You may even want to take a class or two to keep any certifications current.

If you’d like to acquire a new skill, the same advice applies. Enroll in a class. There are many options at local colleges, and online. If you don’t have an opportunity to try your new skill at work, look for a way to volunteer your time – either on a non-profit project or at a part-time internship.

Nurture your network. Take the time to attend networking events. Get lunch and coffee with coworkers from previous jobs. Stay connected.

Reevaluate your priorities. Often, a source of unhappiness can be tied to a shifting of what’s important to you. Early in your career, you may have been willing to work for hours on end just to make the most money possible. As you’ve grown older, financial stability may be less important. You may now be looking for work-life balance, but are still saddled with a 60-hour per week job.

As you can see, much of the independence we crave is tied back to a self-awareness of what’s important to us. And, unlike Independence Day fireworks, career freedom rarely happens all at once. It doesn’t go off with a bang of beautiful lights. Independence at work takes time. It takes commitment. It takes a little dedication each day. But if you’re committed, over time you will find that independence, and the happiness that comes along with it.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach