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What salad dressing best emulates your life philosophy?

When it comes to job interviews, I’ve seen it all. Most interviews come in a fairly straight forward format. You do a phone screen with human resources and then a phone interview with the hiring manager. Afterward, you come in person for meetings with the hiring manager and other folks on the team.

But, not every interview is so simple. Some companies ask job seekers to do a presentation about themselves. Others ask you to complete an IQ test. And, some ask you to create a proposal of how you would spend your first ninety days if you were hired. And, then every once in a while, a company will ask you, “What kind of salad dressing best emulates your life philosophy?”

I know this must sound like a joke. But, no, I’m not kidding. Companies will ask questions such as, “If you were a sandwich, what kind of sandwich would you be?” and, “What font best describes your personality?”

These types of questions can serve a few purposes. First, they can test how you react under pressure. Are you able to roll with the punches, even when you’re asked something outside of the box? They can also test you from a culture fit perspective. Do you answer in a way that is in line with the company culture? And, they can test your creativity. How interesting, thoughtful, and unique is your answer?

Although questions like this really make no sense to many people, I can get behind them under one condition. That condition is that the interview process is a two-way street.

If the job seeker is going to go along with your crazy line of questions, then you in turn (the hiring manager) should treat the candidate with an equal amount of respect. If they’ve put in a lot of time doing homework as part of your process, take the time to follow through with them – even if it’s a little more work. Interview them when you say you will. Respond to their emails. And, if you don’t select them, let them know quickly and in a respectful manner.

The part about this type of process that I do not like is when the entire thing is a one-way street. If a candidate is going to play along with this sort of line of questioning, the company should be prepared to be respectful in return. This is especially true if the candidate has put in a significant amount of time into the application process.

Ghosting a job seeker or taking weeks and weeks to follow up on email communications is not acceptable. It’s no way to treat any potential employee or future representative of your company. When you treat the job search like a joke, you’re treating the candidate as if they are disposable. And, they will likely feel the same about you in return. Treat others the way you want to be treated.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

LinkedIn Focuses on Employee Engagement

I recently had the opportunity to attend LinkedIn’s annual human resources event: Talent Connect. Held in Anaheim, California, the event showcased everything LinkedIn’s been working on in 2018, and their plans for the future. It’s always a great educational event. The information presented ranged from what they’re doing for job seekers with their applicant tracking system — to how they’re helping companies to expand their online learning systems with LinkedIn Learning (formerly known as Lynda.com). They also announced the acquisition of an employee engagement platform: Glint.

Dan Shapero, Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn, announced the purchase on stage, alongside Glint CEO, Jim Barnett. Glint’s mission is to “help people be happier and more successful at work.” The technology is expected to help answer tough HR questions, including: the overall health and performance of the organization, where to find new talent, and if the capabilities of the team are aligned to the business needs.

“With LinkedIn’s insights into the larger workforce alongside Glint’s internal view into employee engagement and skills, we will be able to help talent leaders answer all those difficult questions,” said Shapero. “Glint provides executives with the tools to answer questions about the health and happiness of the talent they have, while giving managers at all levels the access and insight they need to improve.”

Glint’s technology encourages companies to regularly gather employee feedback on work, culture, and leadership. And, it provides those insights back to the leadership team to make informed decisions. This is great news for employees and managers alike.

After all, replacing employees is expensive. And so often, employees aren’t leaving to make more money. They’re leaving because they’re unhappy, or they want more career growth. A solution like Glint may help companies to solve these problems for employees before it’s too late.

As I think back on my experience at LinkedIn Talent Connect, there’s one theme that really shines through. It’s undeniable just how integrated LinkedIn is becoming into each and every one of our professional lives – from the beginning to the end.

Ten years ago, LinkedIn was a simple networking website. Today, it’s a collection of technologies that travel with us through our entire career journey. We use LinkedIn to research where we want to work using their company reviews. We monitor and apply for jobs on LinkedIn. We estimate how much money we should be making using LinkedIn Salary. Once we’re working at a company, we stay in touch with our colleagues there. We use LinkedIn for referrals and references. We use the site as a continuing education resource. We even throw away our business cards because we know we can use LinkedIn instead.

And now, companies are using LinkedIn to find out how they can be better employers for their employees. Regardless of where you are in your career journey, one thing’s for sure. LinkedIn is likely a part of your everyday professional life.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Join me Tuesday for the Indeed Job Market!

I have some exciting news to share with you today! Tomorrow, I will be at the Indeed Job Market and you’re invited! There are three ways to get involved.

  1. Stop by the Indeed Job Market in person in Austin. I will be there to answer your job search questions.
  2. Tweet your job search questions to me at @Indeed at NOON CDT on Tuesday. I will be taking over the Indeed twitter account to answer your questions! Tweet to @Indeed with your job search question and the tag #IndeedJobMarket and I will answer your questions!
  3. RSVP for the event for your chance to win a one-hour career coaching session with me! You can RSVP at www.indeedjobmarket.com, and check out the official rules here: www.indeedjobmarket.com/official-rules/.

As you know, job searching is hard work. So, to make it a little easier, Indeed is bringing the job search to you with the Indeed Job Market. This mobile job search services pop-up is a great place to learn about job searching, to network, and to get the support you need for your successful job search.

The Indeed Job Market pop-up will be located in Austin, Texas on Tuesday, September 22nd. You can come by in person, or you can participate online! I hope to see you there, or to hear from you on Twitter!

At the in person popup in Austin, you’ll find great resources for your search, including:

  • One-on-one job search consultations
  • Indeed Career Guide resources
  • Professional headshots!

I’m so excited to be taking part in this exciting event! I hope you’ll join me.

You’ll have a chance to recharge and explore with complimentary refreshments, professional networking with peers & job search experts, and photo-worthy moments you can share with friends.

On top of all of this goodness, there will be a contest to win an hour long career coaching session with me! RSVP for the event for your chance to win at: www.indeedjobmarket.com. See official contest rules for all the details: www.indeedjobmarket.com/official-rules/.

If you’ll be in Austin, here are the details for coming in person.
What: Indeed Job Market
When: Tuesday, September 25, 2018
Time: 11:00 AM CDT to 7:00 PM CDT
Where: Corner of Guadalupe Street and 25th Street (West Campus)
RSVP: Get your ticket to the Indeed Job Market at www.indeedjobmarket.com

I look forward to seeing you on Tuesday in Austin!

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Ghosting: The dating phenomenon hitting the job search world

The number of companies reporting job search candidates ghosting them is on the rise. Ghosting is a term typically used in dating. It happens when you’ve been dating and one of the people stops responding to all communication with no reasons as to why. They may suddenly stop returning calls, texts, or emails. It’s as if they disappear.

In the past, companies did this to candidates without thinking about it. The job seeker would put in many hours for interviews and preparation. Then, the company would decide it wasn’t a good fit and would drop the candidate.

What goes around comes around it seems. Now that the job market is improving, candidates are dishing this same approach back at employers. Companies are reporting that job seekers are bailing on scheduled interviews. And, after accepting job offers, they aren’t showing up to their first day. Some companies are reporting that existing employees are quitting with no notice. They just don’t come back.

One NBC report estimated that 20 to 50 percent of job applicants and workers are ghosting their employers. So, what’s a company to do about this? The job market is tight, and companies still need to hire.

First and foremost, treat those you’re interviewing the way you’d want to be treated: with respect. Proactive job searching is hard. It’s an emotionally painful process. If you’ve ever been without a job, you know how it feels.

Be transparent. If you already have someone in mind to hire, don’t lead a candidate on needlessly. If you are putting the position on hold, tell them. If the candidate isn’t the right fit, let them know. And, if you aren’t sure when you plan to call them back, be honest.

Last, you’re building a relationship with everyone you interview. Just because they’re not a good fit for this job doesn’t mean they won’t be a fit for a job in the future. And, they may know someone who is a fit. If you work to build a relationship with each person, even if it’s just as a LinkedIn connection, you’ll increase the chances of being a company that people want to work for.

I speak to executives every day who are looking for a new job. They’re shocked at how long it can take. They can’t believe how hard the rejection can be. And, they are often completely unprepared for how out of control they feel through the process. It can be like driving a car that has no brakes.

If you’re a company that’s experiencing candidate ghosting, it’s time to look in the mirror. Are you the kind of place employees want to work? How do you treat the candidates you interview?

The cutthroat approach to business worked, when the market was tough for job seekers. But, now that job seekers are back in the driver’s seat, a new game plan is required to win the best talent.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

When are we going to close down the open office?

I hear from job seekers every day. They’ve been searching for a new job for ages. When they finally land it, they have a concern that’s not about money. It’s their office setup.

For years, open style offices have been all the rage. Whether it’s shared cubicles or a big open room, companies are still hanging onto this concept. Many managers say the environment will foster collaboration and connection. The problem is, collaboration and connection don’t seem to be an issue with those who have offices.

In reality, companies are trying to save money on real estate. And, the employees are the ones who pay the price.

Study after study has confirmed that an open office environment reduces productivity. The BBC found that 70% of US companies are using open offices. Yet, they decrease productivity by at least 15%. In fact, studies show that open office environments also increase sick days at a company. These offices are costing the company valuable time and money.

Chances are, I’m preaching to the choir. I’ve never spoken to a single person who actually likes working in an open office. So, what’s the answer to this problem? If an open office is causing us to be less productive, less happy, and more sick, what can be done?

Companies could go back to the model of having offices with doors, but that’s the most expensive option. A cheaper strategy would be to switch back to tall cubicles that provide more privacy. But, this is also expensive as it can take up valuable real estate.

With these problems in mind, it seems like the ultimate compromise would be more remote worker jobs. In other words, allow employees to work from the comfort of their homes. I know, it sounds a little out there if it’s something you haven’t tried. It can take a little getting used to.

But, Harvard Business Review shared a study where employees were allowed to work from home. They were more productive, happier, and less likely to quit their jobs. And, the company saved $1,900 per employee on office furniture and space.

Remote work has been a trendy conversation topic for some time. A handful of companies are doing it. But, it would be great for companies to begin trying it in large volumes. When an entire department works remotely, one person isn’t left out. Everyone learns to work together in this way.

In addition, remote work would allow workers to redistribute themselves across the country to areas that were the best fit for them and their families. For example, someone working in Silicon Valley may want to relocate to a cheaper city that is closer to family. Vermont is currently offering remote workers a $10,000 incentive to relocate to their state.

Today, companies should revisit their office strategy. It would improve productivity, reduce costs, and give them a broader choice of excellent employees to pick from.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

It’s summer! How are you going to use your vacation?

A good vacation can be one of the most relaxing things you can do for yourself. Whether you prefer the beach, camping, or grilling out in your backyard, down time is something we all need. Unfortunately, we’re not all getting this much needed time to relax. Can you relate?

In the United States, there’s no minimum vacation or holidays that companies are required to provide to workers. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics finds that 77% of employers offer paid vacation time. On average, employers give ten days of vacation after one year of employment. The number of vacation days grows based upon tenure. After twenty years, most employees receive twenty days of vacation. In addition to vacation, many companies offer holidays.

It’s interesting to compare our vacation to other places. In France, employees are granted a minimum of five weeks of vacation. In Australia, the minimum is four weeks. In Belgium, the minimum is twenty-four days. In Denmark, the minimum is five weeks. Now, it’s not to say that there aren’t other countries with smaller vacations. In some areas of Canada, the minimum is ten days, for example.

But, what are we really doing with our two weeks of vacation? You probably guessed it. In many cases, not much. I recently heard an interesting term, “vacation shaming.” It’s an all too familiar idea where employers place negative feelings and shame around the idea of taking time off.

This vacation shaming causes us to feel uncomfortable requesting time away. Despite receiving two weeks of vacation each year, many Americans are only taking about half of it, according to a survey conducted by Glassdoor.com.

Even if we are taking vacation time, many of us are staying plugged in. We answer emails, take phone calls, and sometimes attend meetings remotely. There’s a fear of getting into trouble and losing our job while we’re out.

For employees who do choose to take vacation, some companies set rules that limit the options available. For example, a company may have a policy that an employee may not take more than four or five consecutive days in a row. For those with an international destination in mind, this can really limit the options.

Being successful at work if often tied to being the best version of yourself that you can be. And, that requires you to take care of yourself. Vacation is a great place to start on this goal.

If you’re looking for a new job, do your best to learn about the company’s policy about taking vacation, both official and unofficial. Many online review sites can provide an employee perspective.

Then, don’t forget that vacation time is negotiable – just like salary. When you negotiate your offer letter, know that you can ask for additional time off.

In the long run, taking time for yourself is more important than any amount of vacation shaming. We all need a break sometimes.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach