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2017 Job Search Trends

First, can you believe it’s December 11th?! Wow, this year has really gone by fast! Let’s look at what’s happened in the job search world in 2017…!

Each year, Indeed.com takes a look back at how job searching has changed in the last year. And, they ought to know. Founded in 2004, Indeed holds the title as the world’s largest job website. They get over 200 million unique visitors each month from over 60 countries.

As you probably have, those millions of people use Indeed to search for jobs. And, Indeed has saved all that data about the millions and millions of job searches. They’ve analyzed it to share insights with us for this year — by country.

Some of what they found is widespread. People around the world are looking for jobs related to technology — and to flexibility. And, it makes sense. Who doesn’t want a work-from-home job?

In the U.S., searches for ‘hurricane relief’ are up 682% and searches for ‘no experience required’ are up 1,114%. I have to imagine that searches related to experience have to do with young employees feeling the strain of entry level job postings that require many years of experience.

In Canada, ‘tech,’ ‘finance,’ and ‘full time‘ searches grew. But, older programming languages including Perl, Ruby, and Delphi dropped by 48%. This is just a reminder that to stay relevant in technology jobs, you’ve always got to be learning and evolving.

In Ireland, some of the hot searches were: part-time, talent acquisition, summer internship, and new store opening. But, searches around the construction industry dropped by 65%.

In the Netherlands, ‘furniture maker’ grew by 245%, while ‘nurses’ dropped by 72%.

Belgium has seen a jump in people looking for ‘java‘ related jobs – by 422%. Searches are also up for government related jobs and student jobs.

In France, the number one rising search is for “happiness.” French workers searched for jobs related to happiness by over 200% of what they searched for in 2016. And, ‘PR manager’ jobs were down by 49%.

In Germany, folks were searching for: part-time job, education, optometrist, and cyber security.

In India, people were searching for more jobs related to digital marketing (80%), government jobs (60%), and tech-related jobs (98%). Interestingly, as the government promoted Ayurveda medicine, searches for the holistic system jumped, while searches for pharmaceuticals dropped.

In Australia, the search term ‘457 visa sponsorship‘ rose by 91%. This coincided with the government cutting back on its skilled foreign worker program.

It’s both interesting and a little nuts to see how changes in government or in business can so quickly refocus us and our job searches. I can’t wait to see what’s in store for 2018! To learn more about Indeed’s trends (and a few I left out), check out their entire piece here.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Making the Most of Holiday Parties

We’ve all been there. There’s a company holiday party you’d rather not attend – or maybe your next door neighbors are throwing an event that you just can’t avoid. Whatever the occasion, these parties can be draining during the holidays. This is especially true for those of us who are introverts, or who have other commitments such as children or a demanding job. It can feel like there’s just no room for another to do on the list.

But, if you’re planning to be on the job market next year, holiday parties can truly be the perfect place to kick off your search. Where else will you find such a large group of warm, friendly people in one room together? They’re typically friends you haven’t seen in a while, who genuinely want to know how you’re doing and what you’re up to. And, they’re often looking to reconnect again outside of the event.

Holiday parties are also often very cost effective as they are typically free and at the most, may only require a small host gift or a bottle of wine.

The best part is, you don’t have to wear a suit. And you don’t usually need to deliver your elevator pitch from scratch. You’ll know most people, or a friend will likely introduce you. Conversations will be easier, more interesting, and less forced than a typical networking event.

To truly make the most of your holiday parties this year, plan ahead. Try to get enough rest in advance and be ready to share the latest news in your life. Share personal updates, including changes in your family, your home, or your work. But, do your best to keep your news positive. Holiday parties are meant to be a festive occasion and should focus on the good things going on in your life.

If forced conversations feel difficult, think of a list of questions in advance. Ask how their family is doing. Ask if the friend has any plans to travel or take a vacation soon. Ask about common hobbies and interests.

Remember to bring business cards – and to exchange them with other guests when (and if) it seems appropriate. This will help you to stay in touch with new friends and update your contact information for old ones. If you’re not currently working, a simple card will do. Include your name, phone number, and email address.

After the event, make a point to follow up with the folks you want to stay in touch with. Invite them to your next party. Ask them to have lunch or coffee. And, be sure to connect on LinkedIn.

These small interactions build your friendships and grow your network. When the New Year comes, you’ll be more prepared to put your best foot forward. And, if you do ask a friend for help with a job application, it won’t be the first time they’ve seen you in a while. Build your network of friends when you’re not asking for help with a job.

Angela Copeland is a Career Coach and Founder of Copeland Coaching and can be reached at CopelandCoaching.com or on Twitter at @CopelandCoach.

October & November Recap: They’ve been exciting months! Be sure you don’t miss a minute.

I hope your December is off to a fantastic start! Can you believe it’s almost 2018?! October and November were amazing months for Copeland Coaching. I had such a wonderful time, and can’t wait for the weeks ahead. In case you missed anything, here are the highlights. I hope you enjoy them!


LinkedIn Unveils New Product Offering: LinkedIn Talent Insights

The future of hiring is all about one thing: data. I just returned from one of the largest human resources conferences around, LinkedIn Talent Connect. This year, it was held in the booming city of Nashville, Tennessee. It was every bit as exciting and as intimidating as you can imagine, with over 4,000 human resources managers and recruiters in attendance, representing over 2,000 companies from around the world. At the nearly week-long event, LinkedIn unveiled its latest product offering, LinkedIn Talent Insights. Check out my article on Forbes to learn more about LinkedIn Talent Insights.



CityCurrent Radio Show

I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Jeremy Park from CityCurrent for his radio show. We covered everything from networking to finding a job during the holidays. You can listen to the entire interview here.



How to answer the interview question, “Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss”

Being able to articulate how you handle conflict in the workplace can make or break your shot at impressing an employer. Read tips on answering this tough interview question here.


Copeland Coaching Podcast: Effectively Using LinkedIn with Jennifer Shappley

I recently had the opportunity to talk with LinkedIn’s Senior Director of Talent Acquisition, Jennifer Shappley. I met up with Jennifer during the LinkedIn Talent Connect conference. LinkedIn hosted over 4K recruiters from over 2K companies from around the world. Listen to my conversation with Jennifer and her tips on how you can use LinkedIn more effectively for your job search.



How to move between nonprofits and for-profit companies

Suppose you’re in the middle of your career as an HR professional at a non profit. Seems like snagging a corporate HR gig might be a piece of cake, right? Not exactly. Check out my tips on how to move between these sectors.



Should You Include Hobbies in Your Resume?

I recently had the opportunity to write a piece for LiveCareer. A resume is often the most important factor in deciding whether or not you will get the opportunity to interview for a job. Your resume must be concise and must be targeted to the specific position you want. If you are a job seeker, you may be wondering if you should include hobbies in your resume. The answer to this question, however, is not as simple as it appears to be. Check out my entire article to get tips on when you should and shouldn’t include hobbies in your resume.


Copeland Coaching Podcast: Salary Negotiation with Kwame Christian

On this episode of the Copeland Coaching Podcast, I talk with Kwame Christian in Columbus, Ohio. Kwame is an attorney who focuses on conflict resolution and contract negotiation. We talk in detail about why salary negotiation is so important, how to reduce your stress during a salary negotiation, and when negotiation really begins. To listen to our entire conversation and get tips on how you can make more money, click here.



Job Searching On LinkedIn? 15 Tips You Should Know

With the Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reporting that there are currently 6.1 million job openings in the U.S., one would think that finding a job would be a simple process. Unfortunately, that’s just not the case. Click here to check out 15 tips to help you job search on LinkedIn.


How to answer the interview question, “How do you handle pressure?”

During an interview, the pressure is on. Click here to check out my tips on how to answer the interview question, “How do you handle pressure?”


I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

The Importance of Thanks

The holidays are here again. Along with the turkey, stuffing, and loved ones, there’s more to consider. This season is a time of giving thanks. One of the topics I’m often asked to speak about is personal branding. And, part of your personal brand comes across in the way that you say thank you to others. After you interview for a new job, it’s always a good idea to say thanks. For the most part, I think we can all agree on this idea. But, the question is really – how do exactly do you do it? What’s the best way to say thank you, and what are you saying thank you for?

Think of yourself as a salesperson. You’re selling your services. The company and the hiring manager – they are your customer. You may say, “But, Angela – I really put a lot of work into the interview. It was not easy on me at all.” I get that, and I don’t disagree with you. But, the hiring manager is still the customer, and they will ultimately make the decision on whether or not you’re hired. With that in mind, saying thanks is critical.

The very best solution is to two fold. First, send a thank you email the afternoon after your interview. Then, write a hand written note to drop in the mail. The company may make a decision quickly, so the email ensures your message will get there in time. The handwritten note however is the one that will make you really stand out from your competition. In all likelihood, you will be the only candidate who sent a handwritten note.

Each email and each handwritten note should be personal and sent to just one person. Ideally, send one to each person who interviewed you along the way. The note itself should be brief. You want to thank the person for interviewing you, and if possible, mention something from your conversation. But, stay positive. If you are afraid the interview went badly, this isn’t the time to bring it up. The most important thing is to say thanks.

During a presentation I recently gave on this topic, someone in the audience asked a great question. “In the age of the internet, is it really important to send something that’s handwritten?” The answer is yes. Hiring decisions are not made on the internet. They’re made in real life. People hire people. And, they hire people who they like. The more that you can remember this, the more you’ll increase your odds at landing a job offer.

An online thank you card doesn’t replace a hand written note. I’m sure you may remember the last time you received a hand written thank you note. You may even still have it somewhere. I know that I do. I appreciate these notes, and I keep them. So do other people – including hiring managers. They will keep your hand written message and it will influence them in both this decision, and in the future.

Angela Copeland is a Career Coach and Founder of Copeland Coaching and can be reached at CopelandCoaching.com or on Twitter at @CopelandCoach.

What is Your Biggest Weakness?

One of the favorite interview questions of hiring managers continues to be, “What is your biggest weakness?” This is a tough question all the way around. If you are too honest, you may eliminate yourself from consideration and not get the job at all. But, if you’re not honest enough, you may come across as evasive.

So, what can you do when you’re asked this question during a job interview?

The very first thing to do is prepare. There’s a good chance you will be asked this question, so think about it in advance. Write down how you might answer the question, and practice your answer. Share your thoughts with a friend (or two), and get feedback. Find out what you could do better, and put time into perfecting your response.

Don’t give an answer that is truly critical to the job. For example, if you are interviewing to be a project manager, don’t confess that you struggle with organization and are often late on deadlines. These qualities are key to succeeding as a project manager and would immediately eliminate you from consideration.

On the other extreme, don’t give an answer that is not genuine. Many job seekers tend to give answers along the lines of, “I just work so hard. I can’t stop myself.” Or, “I’m such an overachiever and I have high expectations of those around me.” These answers come across as not being authentic, and no hiring manager will want to hear them.

Instead, I like to think of this question as an opportunity to address the elephant in the room (assuming there is one). For example, I was once asked to consider a part time coaching role with a large organization. During the job interview, the hiring manager asked me, “What is your biggest weakness?”

This was my response. “As you know, I don’t come from a human resources background, like many coaches do. That may be considered a weakness in comparison. However, I have extensive corporate experience in many industries and many job functions – from engineering to marketing. I have interviewed for many different roles myself, and I’m able to bring my own authentic experience to the table to help job seekers do their best.”

In this case, my hiring manager already knew that I had not worked in human resources. It was clear from my resume. She was probably trying to decide whether or not this difference in my background was a problem. Because I brought the issue up directly, I was able to put it to rest quickly. It also gave me a chance to explain why my own unique experience would be an asset to the organization, and might even give me a leg up on my competition. My answer worked well and created space to talk openly about my background.

There’s no one right way to answer this question. In order to give your best answer, prepare in advance. It will allow you to turn your potential weakness into a perceived strength.

Angela Copeland is a Career Coach and Founder of Copeland Coaching and can be reached at CopelandCoaching.com or on Twitter at @CopelandCoach.