Work With Me | 901-878-9758

The Risky Business of Job Searching

I recently heard a stand-up comedian make a joke about dating. They compared the experiences that men have versus women when they go on a Tinder date. They joked that when a man gets ready for a blind date, his biggest worry is that it will be boring. He will have wasted an hour of his life, and perhaps some money.

When a woman prepares for a blind date, her biggest worry is a bit different. In her worst case scenario, she may be physically hurt during the date. Before going on the date, she makes sure to text her friends, to let them know where she is, in case she doesn’t return.

This stand-up routine is meant to be a joke, but it highlights how different an experience can feel when two parties perceive they have different levels of power. Job searching has a similar dynamic.

From the hiring manager’s perspective, a bad interview is a waste of an hour. They’re going to have to keep searching for candidates. It’s a letdown. All of these things are bad. But, think of the flip side of this coin. Think of the work that a job seeker has put into their search. Think of their risk level if something goes wrong.

They’ve put in a lot of time preparing for the interview. They’ve updated their resume and LinkedIn. Perhaps they’ve spent money hiring a professional to help them. They may have purchased a new suit, and spent money on a haircut.

Then, they sneak out of their stable full-time job to come to meet the hiring manager. They’ll make up a lie about being sick, because the company wants to meet them tomorrow and it’s too late to take a vacation day. They are trying to search in secret because if they’re caught searching, the company may view them as disloyal. And, in many states, companies can fire employees for no reason at all.

As a hiring manager, a bad interview is a waste of an hour. As a candidate, a bad interview can cost you your job and future earnings. It’s a huge risk!

Hiring managers, the job market is tight right now. You may be struggling to find the right talent for the job. It’s tough.

If you find yourself in this spot, put yourself in the shoes of the candidate. Consider their risk. Treat them the way you’d want to be treated. Respond to their emails in a timely and respectful way. Don’t have an attitude that they’re lucky to get your time. Look at it like a two-way street and realize they’re evaluating you too.

If you decide they’re not the right fit, continue to treat the person with respect. Let them know your decision in a considerate, human way. Treat them the way you’d want to be treated and you’ll find that your options for candidates will increase.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

179 | Career Reinvention | Chip Conley, NYT Best Selling Author & Disruptive Business Rebel, San Francisco, CA

Episode 179 is live! This week, we talk with Chip Conley in San Francisco, CA.

Chip is a New York Times Best Selling Author, a hospitality entrepreneur, a disruptive business rebel, and a social change agent. He currently serves as a strategic advisor for Airbnb. He is also on the boards of Burning Man, and the Esalen Institute. And, he’s the founder of the Modern Elder Academy.

On today’s episode, Chip shares:

  • The secret to career reinvention
  • The role disruption plays in our careers today
  • How the life stages of learn, earn, and retire have changed
  • How to have a beginner’s mind at any age
  • What it means to be a modern elder
  • Where to begin if we want to reinvent our careers

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about Chip’s work, visit his website at https://chipconley.com/. You can also learn more about the Modern Elder Academy here https://chipconley.com/modern-elder-academy.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find it!

Ghosting: The dating phenomenon hitting the job search world

The number of companies reporting job search candidates ghosting them is on the rise. Ghosting is a term typically used in dating. It happens when you’ve been dating and one of the people stops responding to all communication with no reasons as to why. They may suddenly stop returning calls, texts, or emails. It’s as if they disappear.

In the past, companies did this to candidates without thinking about it. The job seeker would put in many hours for interviews and preparation. Then, the company would decide it wasn’t a good fit and would drop the candidate.

What goes around comes around it seems. Now that the job market is improving, candidates are dishing this same approach back at employers. Companies are reporting that job seekers are bailing on scheduled interviews. And, after accepting job offers, they aren’t showing up to their first day. Some companies are reporting that existing employees are quitting with no notice. They just don’t come back.

One NBC report estimated that 20 to 50 percent of job applicants and workers are ghosting their employers. So, what’s a company to do about this? The job market is tight, and companies still need to hire.

First and foremost, treat those you’re interviewing the way you’d want to be treated: with respect. Proactive job searching is hard. It’s an emotionally painful process. If you’ve ever been without a job, you know how it feels.

Be transparent. If you already have someone in mind to hire, don’t lead a candidate on needlessly. If you are putting the position on hold, tell them. If the candidate isn’t the right fit, let them know. And, if you aren’t sure when you plan to call them back, be honest.

Last, you’re building a relationship with everyone you interview. Just because they’re not a good fit for this job doesn’t mean they won’t be a fit for a job in the future. And, they may know someone who is a fit. If you work to build a relationship with each person, even if it’s just as a LinkedIn connection, you’ll increase the chances of being a company that people want to work for.

I speak to executives every day who are looking for a new job. They’re shocked at how long it can take. They can’t believe how hard the rejection can be. And, they are often completely unprepared for how out of control they feel through the process. It can be like driving a car that has no brakes.

If you’re a company that’s experiencing candidate ghosting, it’s time to look in the mirror. Are you the kind of place employees want to work? How do you treat the candidates you interview?

The cutthroat approach to business worked, when the market was tough for job seekers. But, now that job seekers are back in the driver’s seat, a new game plan is required to win the best talent.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

When are we going to close down the open office?

I hear from job seekers every day. They’ve been searching for a new job for ages. When they finally land it, they have a concern that’s not about money. It’s their office setup.

For years, open style offices have been all the rage. Whether it’s shared cubicles or a big open room, companies are still hanging onto this concept. Many managers say the environment will foster collaboration and connection. The problem is, collaboration and connection don’t seem to be an issue with those who have offices.

In reality, companies are trying to save money on real estate. And, the employees are the ones who pay the price.

Study after study has confirmed that an open office environment reduces productivity. The BBC found that 70% of US companies are using open offices. Yet, they decrease productivity by at least 15%. In fact, studies show that open office environments also increase sick days at a company. These offices are costing the company valuable time and money.

Chances are, I’m preaching to the choir. I’ve never spoken to a single person who actually likes working in an open office. So, what’s the answer to this problem? If an open office is causing us to be less productive, less happy, and more sick, what can be done?

Companies could go back to the model of having offices with doors, but that’s the most expensive option. A cheaper strategy would be to switch back to tall cubicles that provide more privacy. But, this is also expensive as it can take up valuable real estate.

With these problems in mind, it seems like the ultimate compromise would be more remote worker jobs. In other words, allow employees to work from the comfort of their homes. I know, it sounds a little out there if it’s something you haven’t tried. It can take a little getting used to.

But, Harvard Business Review shared a study where employees were allowed to work from home. They were more productive, happier, and less likely to quit their jobs. And, the company saved $1,900 per employee on office furniture and space.

Remote work has been a trendy conversation topic for some time. A handful of companies are doing it. But, it would be great for companies to begin trying it in large volumes. When an entire department works remotely, one person isn’t left out. Everyone learns to work together in this way.

In addition, remote work would allow workers to redistribute themselves across the country to areas that were the best fit for them and their families. For example, someone working in Silicon Valley may want to relocate to a cheaper city that is closer to family. Vermont is currently offering remote workers a $10,000 incentive to relocate to their state.

Today, companies should revisit their office strategy. It would improve productivity, reduce costs, and give them a broader choice of excellent employees to pick from.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

178 | Gutsy Job Seeking | Kate White, Author & Former Cosmopolitan Editor-In-Chief, New York, NY

Episode 178 is live! This week, we talk with Kate White in New York, NY.

Kate is the New York Times bestselling author of twelve murder mysteries AND multiple career books, including I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This: How to Ask for the Money, Snag the Promotion, and Create the Career You Deserve, and The Gutsy Girl Handbook: Your Manifesto for Success.

On today’s episode, Kate shares:

  • What she learned from her career as Editor-In-Chief at Cosmopolitan magazine
  • Her advice for media and journalism job seekers
  • Brave job search strategies for job seekers
  • Tips on your appearance during an interview
  • What she learned about asking for a higher salary that will help you in your job search

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about Kate’s work, visit her website at http://www.katewhitespeaks.com/.  You can also follow her on Twitter at @katemwhite. You can find her books on Amazon.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find it!