Work With Me | 901-878-9758

182 | The Rise of Cybersecurity Jobs | Bart R. McDonough, CEO, Agio, New York, NY

Episode 182 is live! This week, we talk with Bart R. McDonough in New York, NY.

Bart is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer at Agio. Agio is a managed IT and cybersecurity firm serving the financial services, healthcare, and payments industries.

On today’s episode, Bart shares:

  • Why cybersecurity jobs are on the rise
  • The types of jobs available in the cybersecurity industry
  • Who may want to consider transitioning into cybersecurity
  • How to switch into cybersecurity

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about Agio work, visit Bart’s website at https://agio.com/.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find it!

Why Job Seekers Walk Away

If you’re a hiring manager, there’s a good chance you’re finding it harder to hire this year than one year ago. The unemployment rate just fell to the lowest level since 1969, so the competition is fierce for good workers. In fact, it’s taking 82% longer to fill open jobs than just a few years ago in 2010. And, on average, it’s taking companies 31 days to hire.

I recently had the opportunity to attend an event in Chicago hosted by Glassdoor, and I want to share a few of their findings with you. In particular, I want to focus in on why employers are losing their top candidates.

Glassdoor identified three big frustrations for job seekers that are going through the interview process. Job seekers feel frustrated at a lack of information about the job’s pay and benefits. They also feel frustrated that employers are cancelling or postponing their interviews. And, they’re upset that potential employers aren’t responding to them in a timely manner.

“Job seekers clearly feel that understanding the total compensation package, including pay and benefits, is absolutely essential to fully evaluate a job opportunity,” said Julie Coucoules, Glassdoor’s Global Head of Talent Acquisition.

I bet you can relate. The last time you looked for a job, I’m sure these things were on your mind too. To keep top candidates engaged, consider sharing your salary and benefits up front. Don’t turn the first screening call into a game, where you try to outsmart the candidate to get their number first. Treat candidates the way you’d want to be treated. Be respectful of their time. Keep your commitments, and let them know when you’ve moved on. Nothing is more stressful than just not knowing what has happened with a job you’re applying to.

Glassdoor also found a number of reasons that top candidates would pull out of the recruitment process. In other words, the candidate turns you down before you get the chance to even given them an offer. The top reason identified was an employer that has announced layoffs. This makes sense, right? Nobody wants to sign up to lose their job just after switching.

Other reasons cited were a poor first interaction with a recruiter or hiring manager. 40 percent of those surveyed identified this as a reason to pull out of the process. 35 percent said they would drop the company if they read negative employee reviews online. 33 percent said they would leave if they heard about employee or leadership scandals and 32 percent said they would leave if they read negative news coverage about the company.

The most straightforward suggestion from this list is to treat each candidate with the respect you’d want to be treated with. Beyond that, don’t undervalue the importance of your company’s online reviews or media coverage. With the transparency that’s available online, the hiring process really has turned into a two way street.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

The Tech Interview

You know, I love tech companies. With a computer engineering undergrad, I’ve spent my entire career working in the world of technology in one way or another.

I’ve recently met a number of job seekers who have had job interviews at tech companies. They’re the kind of companies with only a few hundred employees. They have ping pong tables, video games, and free lunch.

Quickly, I noticed that something was different about their interview experience. Before the interview, we worked to update their resume and elevator pitch. But, nothing could have really prepared us for what happened next.

The attitude inside the doors of the tech companies was different – very different. Lots of young, flip-flop wearing employees fill giant tables where they are setup with computer monitors. There are no offices or cubicles. Imagine working in a Starbucks, or a lunchroom. Employees look exhausted. Their eyes are red and they’re yawning while interviewing candidates. Despite the office perks, these folks are working their hearts out day and night. And, the stress of the environment seems to come through in the interview.

Many of the interviews are what’s sometimes called a stress interview. They’re interviews designed to upset the job seeker, and to get a reaction out of them. In the middle of the interview, the hiring manager might tell the candidate that they’re not qualified for the role and that their experience is useless to the company. They do this all in a relatively rude and challenging way. Then, the hiring manager asks the candidate to respond. I’m really not sure how a candidate is expected to respond in these situations, especially if they have any self-respect.

There’s also an obsession around money. At a tech startup, everybody wants to know how much money you want to make. If you’re coming from any sort of non-startup environment, it can be tough to pin down your salary requirements because the benefits are different. Startups often provide equity in place of high salaries.

Tech companies are also looking for someone like them. Even when a candidate has all the required experience, it is very common for the number one objection to be, “You’ve never worked in tech.”

A number of tech companies also have an internal voting structure. Rather than the hiring manager selecting you, the entire team is involved. The team will meet together after you interview to decide whether or not you’re a fit. At some organizations, even one vote against you can keep you from being hired.

Right or wrong, this seems to be the reality that tech companies are living in. If you decide to interview at one, be sure to prepare yourself. On top of your normal interview preparation, learn as much as you can about the company, their culture, and their interview process. To score big at a tech company, you need to be more than qualified. You need to fit in.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Purple Unicorns Don’t Exist

Dear Hiring Manager,

You’re amazing. You’re the gatekeeper to new jobs, and the person who will later help us to get a promotion that will help our careers. But, we have to talk.

The last eighteen years have been great. Unemployment was high. You’ve been able to be picky. You could create a long wish list for your open jobs, and a perfect candidate would appear. They might even take less money than market value. You didn’t have to bother about relocation. They were so happy to have a job, they’d move themselves. And, forget about signing bonuses or extra vacation days. Those things were so 1999.

Landing a great candidate was easy. People were desperate to find work, and willing to put up with just about anything you could dish out. But, the time to rebalance things has come. After all the good years, we are back down to record low unemployment. It’s below four percent.

The good news is, people are feeling excited again. Jobs are coming open that haven’t been available in a while. Things are going well for everyone. You’re probably happy too. You’re able to hire again. You’ll be able to bring new folks into the organization. It will be a great time for fresh, new ideas!

But, there’s one little change since last time you were hiring. The market has shifted to the favor of the job seeker. This isn’t bad. It means that you’re going to find someone who really wants to work for you. They’re not going to join your organization just to escape their current role. They actually like you, and your open job.

This change comes with a catch. You’re going to have to cut back on that big wish list. I know; it’s hard. You want everything in one person. You want someone who understands sales and marketing and technology and operations. They need ten years of experience. They should’ve worked at an organization just like yours. And, they should have used all of the same software that you use.

This is where I have to be honest with you. This person does not exist. In the world of hiring, they’re called a Purple Unicorn (no kidding). As long as you keep searching for the unicorn, your jobs are going to remain unfilled. You are frustrating your company’s human resources team with your unrealistic requests. You’re offending great candidates. And, your jobs are staying open for over ninety days.

So, what’s the answer? It’s time to cut your wish list of twenty requirements back to six. It’s time to look for fit. And, it’s time to look for the person who’s willing to work hard and has the right attitude. That’s the person you want on your team. Not just someone who can check a bunch of boxes. The sooner you can understand this, the faster you will find the right people.

Sincerely,

Angela

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Getting a Job is a Job

It’s official. It’s less than sixty days until Thanksgiving. Although you shouldn’t stop your job search when the turkey has been served, hiring will slow down as the holidays heat up. It’s just a fact of life. If you’ve been thinking of finding a new job, this is the time.

But, finding a job isn’t just about wanting one. When you’re passively thinking about getting a job, you can stand to wait a few years until one falls into your lap. But, if you’re hoping to find one now, being passive isn’t going to cut it. You’re going to have to work for it the old fashioned way. You’re going to have to put in time – lots of time.

You may be thinking, “But, Angela, I’m a busy person! I have a full-time job. I have a family. I have commitments! I only have so much time in a week.” I hear you. I get it. I empathize with your situation more than you can imagine. But, at the end of the day, you have to decide. Do you want to find a new job this year or not? It’s up to you.

If it’s important to you, you’re going to find the time. You may have to cut back a little on other activities. You may have to take vacation days to work on your search. You may have to sleep a little less. I know. None of these are fun options. But, they’re the only way. Someone shared with me once, “Look at your schedule and you’ll find the things you value. You make time for those things.”

If you truly want to find a new job, you’re going to have to carve time out. You need time to update your resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn. You need time to network with your old contacts. You need time to apply for jobs, and to perfect your elevator pitch and your personal brand. And, you need time to interview for jobs.

You can’t outsource this work. Your job search is just that: yours. No matter how high up the food chain you are at work, you’re still in charge of your job search. You’ve got to do the writing, the calling, and the looking.

Remember, once you get into a company’s interview process, it can go fast or slow. It’s hard to predict. It could take just a few days, or it could take months. Putting in the time now is the only way to get there. You may wonder how much time I’m talking about. Try to put in at least two hours each day.

Looking for a new job isn’t going to be fast. It’s not going to be easy. Frankly, it’s probably going to be a painful process. But, it is absolutely worth it to take a risk and put in the time to find something that you truly love.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach