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166 | You just got laid off. Now what? – Elizabeth Gross, Founder, Job Search Divas

Episode 166 is live! This week, we talk with Elizabeth Gross in Boston, Massachusetts.

Elizabeth is the Founder of Job Search Divas, where she helps job seekers through their job search journey. Elizabeth has extensive experience at a number of companies, including Monster, Bank of America, and Constant Contact.

On today’s episode, Elizabeth shares:

  • The first thing you should do when you’ve been laid off
  • The biggest challenge you may face if you’ve been laid off
  • What you can do to be a better job candidate online
  • Which emotional support you should (and shouldn’t) seek out after you’ve been laid off

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about Elizabeth, visit her website at www.jobsearchdivas.com.

Thanks to everyone for listening! And, thank you to those who sent me questions. You can send me your questions to Angela@CopelandCoaching.com. You can also send me questions via Twitter. I’m @CopelandCoach. And, on Facebook, I am Copeland Coaching.

Don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave me a review!

 

Running Away Money

I recently had the privilege of interviewing Margaret Heffernan. Margaret is incredibly impressive, with a career that includes running five companies in the United States and the United Kingdom, being a college professor, authoring five books, and giving multiple TED Talks. Originally from Texas, Margaret has lived all over, including in the U.K.

Margaret’s career is so impressive that it was hard to narrow down the questions to a list that would fit into one podcast episode. As you can imagine, the interview was wonderful. The insights Margaret shared haven’t left my mind since we spoke.

Margaret describes herself as someone that has always done work that she’s loved. At times, she was paid well, and other times she made very little. But, she was always happy in her work. I asked her how she was able to organize her career this way.

She made two important points that I want to share with you. When a job wasn’t the right fit, she didn’t hesitate to walk away – even if she had only been there for a short period of time. This reminds me of the way a company would quickly fire someone if they weren’t the right fit. But, as employees, we stick around out of some kind of artificial loyalty.

When Margaret worked in an environment where it was clear that succeeding would be an uphill battle, she looked for another job that was a better fit. This would happen in situations where perhaps the staff didn’t treat everyone fairly. Rather than take it personally, she moved on and looked for a better situation. This must have been a tough decision at times, given how important equality is. But, I think we can all agree that it’s easier to succeed in an environment that supports you and your talent.

The second tip Margaret he was gold, quite literally. She said she was always careful to keep enough, “running away money on hand.” I can’t tell you how happy this phrase makes me. Running away money is often referred to as an emergency fund. It is typically six to twelve months of salary (or living expenses) saved up. Most people place this money in a savings account for safe keeping.

Having a financial safety net gives you choices. It allows you to walk away if you really need to. It allows you to control your own destiny, not your company. Very often, when we upgrade our house, our cars, and our lifestyles, we are simply chaining ourselves to the very company we hate.

And as Margaret noted, just having the running away money doesn’t mean you actually need to run away. It often gives you a boost of confidence to be yourself at work. You know you’ll be okay, even if everything else falls apart. That added confidence alone makes things at work go better, and it keeps you from running away at all.

You can listen to my entire interview with Margaret Heffernan here.

Angela Copeland, a career coach and founder of Copeland Coaching, can be reached at copelandcoaching.com.

SXSW 2018 Recap: My First Year Experience

I recently had the opportunity to attend South by Southwest in Austin, Texas for the first time. If you’ve never been, SXSW is a giant festival in downtown Austin that draws in thousands of people. Founded in 1987, SXSW has boasted an economic impact to Austin of over $300 M in past years.

Since it started, SXSW has grown in both size and scope. It is now a combination of a number of festivals in one, including music, film, comedy, interactive, health and more. My main focus was on the “more” part. I attended a number of sessions on topics related to today’s workplace trends.

The workplace sessions were structured in one of two ways. Either a single speaker would give a lecture on one topic, or a panel of three to five experts would weigh in on a particular issue. Topics ranged from negotiation to sexism to diversity to new employer perks to faith in the workplace to the gender pay gap to neurodiversity. This was a lot of ground to cover in a short amount of time!

As you can imagine, the speakers were both incredibly talented and informative. In fact, I’ve had the opportunity to interview a number of them for my podcast.

So many important ideas were shared in these workplace sessions. Some companies are now offering creative benefits, including paying back your student loans after you finish college. It’s no longer unusual to start your career over from scratch midway through, and more programs than ever are available to help make the process possible. Organizations are increasing their focus on diversity and inclusion, using both their existing teams and new technology to make it happen.

But, the point that I really took away from my SXSW experience has to do with networking. You can listen to all of the lectures presented, but nothing compares to what you can learn from other people. And, SXSW is the perfect place to meet or reconnect with those people.

I met up with a number of old colleagues during my visit. I met a number of new people, from various industries and from around the world. And, I met a number of great people from career websites LinkedIn and Indeed.

These conversations provided an incredible amount of value – more than I could have gained in any classroom. They led to new connections, new ideas, new podcast episodes, and new opportunities.

The experience reminded me just how important networking is to your overall career. It’s not only important to meet new people, but it’s important to stay in touch. It’s important to reconnect. It’s important to help one another. Networking is very often what your next job is made from.

I look forward to attending SXSW again next year. But, my focus on networking will increase. After all, where else in the world can you connect with so many creative and talented people in one place?

Angela Copeland, a career coach and founder of Copeland Coaching, can be reached at copelandcoaching.com.

165 | Friend of a Friend – Dr. David Burkus, Author, Speaker, Professor, Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, Oklahoma

Episode 165 is live! This week, we talk with Dr. David Burkus in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

David is an author, speaker, and associate professor of leadership and innovation at Oral Roberts University. His new book, Friend of a Friend, offers readers a new perspective on how to grow their networks and build key connections. He also gave a TEDx Talk titled, “Why you should know how much your coworkers get paid.”

On today’s episode, David shares:

  • What pay transparency is, and the pros and cons of using it
  • Why we may feel underpaid, and what we can do about it
  • Why networking and professional networks are important to our careers
  • What a super connector is, and why they matter
  • What you can do if you’re looking for a networking option that’s not a mixer

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about David and his new book Friend of a Friend, visit his website at https://davidburkus.com.

Thanks to everyone for listening! And, thank you to those who sent me questions. You can send me your questions to Angela@CopelandCoaching.com. You can also send me questions via Twitter. I’m @CopelandCoach. And, on Facebook, I am Copeland Coaching.

Don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave me a review!

Conquering the Tech Interview with Confidence

I often get questions about what it’s like to interview for a technology job. In particular, job seekers ask what it’s like to interview to be a computer programmer. In fact, my most popular podcast episode ever was with a former Google recruiter, Gayle Laakmann, who described how to prepare for a coding interview.

Years ago, after my bachelor of computer and systems engineering, I competed in a few technical interviews. In the most memorable interview, I was asked to create a complete website. This was before the days of Squarespace and WordPress. The site had to be hand coded, and frankly, it took forever. I learned in this interview that employers have high expectations of computer programmers.

Perhaps they have good reason to give extensive interviews. It’s been said that a great coder can produce ten times as much code as a bad coder. And, it’s hard to get rid of a full time employee after they’re hired. Plus, unlike many other jobs, you really can give a developer a skills test. There are few other jobs where the interview process can give such clear and accurate feedback. On top of everything else, developers aren’t cheap. A company wants to be sure they know what they’re getting in advance.

A job seeker recently shared their coding interview experience with me, in hopes that it might help other developers. They had an initial interview at a company that was looking for experience with a particular programming language. Quickly, the candidate shared that they have not used this programming language in a number of years. They were assured that it would be no problem. The fundamentals were much more important.

During the second round of interviews, the same candidate was asked to complete a test. The test was using a technology that they weren’t familiar with. They were able to do research on their own, but it wasn’t enough. As you can imagine, the candidate walked away feeling unhappy with the experience.

Similar to the “build a website” homework that I had, this homework was meant to push the candidate’s limits. As frustrating as the experience can be, companies use these techniques to vet out potential employees. And, in some cases, the company does this to their own detriment. They can easily burn through candidates and come up with no one to hire.

As a candidate, one takeaway is this. Interviewing is a two way street. I often compare it to dating. Since when do we go on a first date and hope the person will marry us, before we’ve even ordered drinks? Interviewing is no different. Prepare and do your best. But, take the time to pay attention to how the hiring manager treats you. Look for a mutual match. If you don’t find a good fit, keep moving on. Just like with dating, if you stay with someone who’s a bad fit, you may miss out on the right opportunity.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Celebrating MLK 50 & Increasing Our Collective Focus on Diversity & Inclusion


Today is such an important day in history. Today is a day of remembrance and the 50th commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In this important time of change, I want to share content related to diversity and inclusion that I think you will enjoy.

MLK50 Livestream

If you’re located in Memphis, there are lots of opportunities to get involved in the MLK50 Commemoration in person. But, if you’re outside of the city, the National Civil Rights Museum is live streaming the celebration TODAY. It is live now and will go all day. Check out the MLK50 Livestream here.

I AM 2018

I had the opportunity to attend a wonderful event this past weekend hosted by AFSCME Local 1733 — I AM 2018. It was a moving tribute to Dr. King and the sanitation workers who striked in 1968. The event was a perfect opportunity to learn more about history, and to stand together. Jesse Jackson spoke about his experience in the Civil Rights Movement. And, the strikers from 1968 attended the event. They had a grand entrance that was truly inspiring. I really cannot say enough about how much I enjoyed this event, and how much I appreciate the folks who put it together.

Below are a few photos from the event.

 

Podcast: Diversity & Inclusion with Mark Lobosco, VP of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn

I had the opportunity to interview Mark Lobosco, the Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn for the Copeland Coaching Podcast. Mark sponsors a number of company-wide Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging initiatives at LinkedIn.

On the episode, Mark shares:

  • The differences between diversity, inclusion, and belonging – and why they are important
  • Why companies are increasing their focus on diversity
  • How to identify companies that are diverse and inclusive when you’re job seeking
  • Predictions on how diversity will continue to evolve in the workplace

You can play the podcast on CopelandCoaching.com, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also find it in Amazon Alexa as a new Alexa Skill.

Using Transparency to Build a Diverse Workforce

My Career Corner column this week is about diversity, and it’s importance in our workplace. It’s such an important and relevant topic that I want to share it with you here today.

Diversity is one of the most important issues companies are focused on today. LinkedIn recently found that over half of companies say they are very or extremely focused on diversity. This is good news, especially when you consider this. The World Economic Forum recently estimated that it will take 217 years for women to reach complete equality in pay and employment opportunities.

It should be noted that one of the key tools we have available today that was not available years ago is the internet. The transparency now available, especially as it relates to employment, is a gold mine for job seekers. Sites such as Glassdoor, LinkedIn, and Indeed.com provide important data points, including how much workers are paid and how employees rate their workplaces.

To further the mission of diversity, Indeed.com recently announced a partnership with three other websites that focus on inclusiveness in the workplace. This partnership with Fairygodboss.com, InHerSight.com, and Comparably.com will help to provide additional information to job seekers.

The information will show up on the Indeed “Company Pages.” It will allow job seekers to better evaluate the diversity and inclusiveness of an organization. Today’s Company Pages include ratings for work/life balance, compensation/benefits, job security/advancement, management, and culture. In the future, there will also be scores from InHerSight, Comparably, and Fairygodboss that will rank the companies from one to five stars and as a number from one to 100.

The internet still remains an unlikely place to land your next job. But, the data available will help you to decide whether or not you want to accept a job offer from a particular company.

Salary data will also help you to know what is considered fair pay in your industry. In corporate roles, employers setup pay bands. It can be surprising to know that for one job, the pay band can sometimes vary as much as $40,000 or more. That means that one person doing the job may make $65,000, and another person doing the same job may make over $100,000. In theory, this range allows companies to compensate employees based upon experience. In reality, how much you make is often tied to how skilled you are at negotiation.

Using the data available online will help you to ensure you’re getting a fair deal. It will allow you to verify that your future employer is a healthy place to work. And, it will give you a view into your employer’s values and priorities.

This sort of valuable feedback is often not something you can typically find out during a job interview.

Long story short, we still have a long way to go on issues related to diversity and pay equality for all people, including women and men from all backgrounds. But, this level of increased transparency will help you to be your own advocate. Perhaps together, we can shorten the time it will take to reach complete equality in the workplace.

I hope you have a wonderful day, and that you’re able to take a few minutes to commemorate the important work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Using Transparency to Build a Diverse Workforce

Diversity is one of the most important issues companies are focused on today. LinkedIn recently found that over half of companies say they are very or extremely focused on diversity. This is good news, especially when you consider this. The World Economic Forum recently estimated that it will take 217 years for women to reach complete equality in pay and employment opportunities.

It should be noted that one of the key tools we have available today that was not available years ago is the internet. The transparency now available, especially as it relates to employment, is a gold mine for job seekers. Sites such as Glassdoor, LinkedIn, and Indeed.com provide important data points, including how much workers are paid and how employees rate their workplaces.

To further the mission of diversity, Indeed.com recently announced a partnership with three other websites that focus on inclusiveness in the workplace. This partnership with Fairygodboss.com, InHerSight.com, and Comparably.com will help to provide additional information to job seekers.

The information will show up on the Indeed “Company Pages.” It will allow job seekers to better evaluate the diversity and inclusiveness of an organization. Today’s Company Pages include ratings for work/life balance, compensation/benefits, job security/advancement, management, and culture. In the future, there will also be scores from InHerSight, Comparably, and Fairygodboss that will rank the companies from one to five stars and as a number from one to 100.

The internet still remains an unlikely place to land your next job. But, the data available will help you to decide whether or not you want to accept a job offer from a particular company.

Salary data will also help you to know what is considered fair pay in your industry. In corporate roles, employers setup pay bands. It can be surprising to know that for one job, the pay band can sometimes vary as much as $40,000 or more. That means that one person doing the job may make $65,000, and another person doing the same job may make over $100,000. In theory, this range allows companies to compensate employees based upon experience. In reality, how much you make is often tied to how skilled you are at negotiation.

Using the data available online will help you to ensure you’re getting a fair deal. It will allow you to verify that your future employer is a healthy place to work. And, it will give you a view into your employer’s values and priorities.

This sort of valuable feedback is often not something you can typically find out during a job interview.

Long story short, we still have a long way to go on issues related to diversity and pay equality for all people, including women and men from all backgrounds. But, this level of increased transparency will help you to be your own advocate. Perhaps together, we can shorten the time it will take to reach complete equality in the workplace.

Angela Copeland, a career coach and founder of Copeland Coaching, can be reached at copelandcoaching.com.

164 | Diversity & Inclusion – Mark Lobosco, Vice President of Talent Solutions, LinkedIn, San Francisco, CA

Episode 164 is live! This week, we talk with Mark Lobosco in San Francisco, California.

Mark is the Vice President of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn. He’s responsible for leading the global pre-sales, sales and customer success teams for LinkedIn’s Talent Solutions business. Mark also sponsors a number of company-wide Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging initiatives and is the executive sponsor of HOLA, LinkedIn’s Latin employee resource group.

I’m excited to invite Mark onto the show today to talk about diversity in today’s workplace. There are so many important discussions going on around diversity right now, that include issues including race, gender, age, disabilities, and more.

We are also commemorating the 50th year of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s legacy this month, so this is an important time to have this conversation. With these things in mind, LinkedIn recently released its report on 2018 Global recruiting trends. We will dig into LinkedIn’s findings and why they are important.

On today’s episode, Mark shares:

  • The differences between diversity, inclusion, and belonging
  • Why companies are increasing their focus on diversity
  • How to identify companies that are diverse and inclusive when you’re job seeking
  • Predictions on how diversity will continue to evolve in the workplace

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also find it in Amazon Alexa as a new Alexa Skill!

To learn more about Mark and LinkedIn, visit LinkedIn.com at https://www.linkedin.com/in/marklobosco/.

Thanks to everyone for listening! And, thank you to those who sent me questions. You can send me your questions to Angela@CopelandCoaching.com. You can also send me questions via Twitter. I’m @CopelandCoach. And, on Facebook, I am Copeland Coaching.

Don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave me a review!

 

March in Review: Kicking Off April Strong

Happy April second! I hope you’re doing well and that your weekend was a good one. March was an awesome month for me and Copeland Coaching. I’m so excited to share all the details with you here.


 


Copeland Coaching Podcast is now an Alexa Skill

I’m still in disbelief. Amazon has added the Copeland Coaching Podcast as an Alexa Skill. This means that you can now play the show on any Alexa enabled device. I’ve tested it out with my Echo speaker.

I’d love for you to check it out, and it would be amazing if you would leave me a review. Amazon cares about reviews. Reviews help to make the show easier for others to find.

If you’re interested to listen to the show on Alexa, or to leave a review, here’s a video tutorial to show you how to do it!



I Attended My First SXSW

If you follow me on Instagram, you know that I was in Austin this month. I attended the Workplace portion of the SXSW festival. It covered tons of interesting topics, from salary negotiation to creative HR benefits to diversity and pay equality. It was an exciting week filled with great information!
I’ve been interviewing a number of the speakers for my podcast and will continue to share the episodes into the coming weeks.

Check out the episodes that are already available on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.


I Visited Indeed.com in Person

What! How exciting is this! I visited the number one job site in the world – in person!

I can’t thank the awesome folks at Indeed enough for inviting me to their campus. They treated me to a wonderful lunch in their gourmet cafeteria and gave me a tour of their campus. I really got a chance to see the people whose motto is, “We help people get jobs.”

I continue to be impressed by the focus and effort that Indeed puts into treating its employees well. On top of interesting work, “Indeedians” receive fun perks such as unlimited vacation and free lunches. There’s more to it than this, but the more I get to know Indeed, the more I’m convinced that it’s a special place to work.


Know Your Myers-Briggs Type Indicator? Use Your Results To Your Advantage

You know I love the Myers-Briggs assessment! I am so happy to be included in Forbes this month with my thoughts on how you can use the MBTI to your advantage.

“The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality test can be a fun thing to do. It’s especially helpful if you’re thinking of switching careers, but you’re not sure what you’d like to do. The MBTI can help you to identify strengths and potential future career paths that you may not have thought of before.”

Check out the entire piece on Forbes.com.


This Is What An A+ LinkedIn Summary Looks Like

Two awesome things together in one place: Girlboss and LinkedIn. Huge thank you to Girlboss for including my advice on this piece about making your LinkedIn the best it can be.

“The LinkedIn summary is a like a mini-bio. Use it to give a brief personal narrative of your background. Don’t hesitate to restate important facts that can be found later in your profile. The reader may not make it all the way down your profile.”

Check out all of the advice on how to write an A+ LinkedIn summary on Girlboss.


Relight Your Spark: 15 Ways To Renew Motivation At A Long-Term Job

If you’ve been at your job for years and need a little inspiration, this piece is for you. Big thanks to Forbes for including my tips on how to renew your motivation.

“If you’re feeling burned out at your current job, a great next step is to begin exploring alternative opportunities. It’s much easier to stay excited about what you’re doing today if you know that you’re working on your next big move. But, be careful to job search at home. You want to give it your all when you’re at your current job.”

Check out all the ways you can renew your motivation on Forbes.


Copeland Coaching Podcast

I had a number of incredible guests in March. You can listen to the interviews on the Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Alexa, or wherever you download podcasts.

Margaret Heffernan, Willful Blindness – Margaret has run five different businesses in the U.S. and the U.K. She teaches at several business schools in the U.S. and U.K. and sit on the boards of three organizations. Margaret has published five books including: Willful Blindness, A Bigger Prize, and The Naked Truth. She’s also given multiple TED Talks, and speaks at conferences and organizations around the world.

Audrey Boring, Aces Branding – Audrey is an independent marketing and advertising professional. She began her creative career as a copywriter, setting up her own freelance business in 2010. She has worked with clients such as Blinds.com, International Paper, and St. Louis Children’s Hospital. She also recently spoke at SXSW about “Building the creative career you’re meant to have.”

Alexandra Dickinson, Ask For It – Alexandra is an entrepreneur who teaches people to negotiate. She’s the Founder and CEO of the negotiation training and coaching company Ask For It. She is a contributing writer at Women at Forbes and has spoken at organizations like UN Women, Columbia Business School, and Facebook. She spoke at SXSW on the topic, “Time’s Up on the Gender Pay Gap: How to Negotiate in 2018.”

Dr. Karlyn Borysenko, Zen Workplace – Karlyn is the Principle at Zen Workplace. She is an organizational psychologist and performance coach. Karlyn helps individuals find greater happiness and fulfillment in their professional lives, and works with organizations to help create amazing environments for their teams that drive productivity. She spoke at SXSW at a session called “Zen Your Work: Creating an Ideal Work Experience.”


Career Corner Column

When to Ask Your Boss for More Money – Who wouldn’t like to make more money? If you’ve read my column before, you probably know that I’m an advocate of changing companies every three to five years (for many industries).

Starting a Digital Marketing Career – Digital marketing is a hot field. It has been hot for more than ten years. I rarely share much about how to move into the field of digital marketing.

Secrets Recruiters Won’t Tell You– Applying for a job seems like a fair process. You apply online, and if you’re a good fit for the job, the company will give you a call.

The New World of Social Media – Social media used to be so fun. We could all stay connected with friends and family, for long periods of time and around the world.


I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

When to Ask Your Boss for More Money

Who wouldn’t like to make more money? If you’ve read my column before, you probably know that I’m an advocate of changing companies every three to five years (for many industries). On top of gaining extra experience, switching has the potential to bump up your pay considerably. But, there are often times when you need a raise at your current employer.

So, where do you start? If you want the best chance of landing a raise of more than two or three percent, do it at a time when your role has evolved quite a bit. This would be the case if your work has grown into a new area, has expanded significantly in scope, or has added management responsibilities. For example, if you were hired as an individual contributor and are now managing a team of seven, the scope of your job has changed.

It’s easier to ask for more money if your job has changed significantly because you aren’t asking for more money for your existing job. That may sound silly, especially if you’re doing more than your peers. You may be smarter, saving more money, or getting more done. But, it’s hard for a manager to justify paying you much more for any of these things.

When your job has changed, you’re essentially asking for a fair amount of money for a new job. While you’re making the case, it may also be a good time to request a new title and an updated job description. This way, you are officially taking your current position to the next level.

Once you’ve decided you’re ready to make a case for more, you’ll want to find the perfect time. It may be during your annual performance evaluation. Or, you may want to lobby for more money at another time, in hopes that your manager won’t be restricted by a certain pool of money.

Whenever you decide to do it, plan ahead. Request a meeting in advance, so your boss won’t be caught off guard. Prepare your case in such a way that your manager can easily advocate for you. In other words, don’t make it hard for your boss to give you more money. Do as much of the work for them as you can.

Consider preparing a presentation that shows how your job has changed. Highlight your accomplishments. Include any numeric results you can show, including how much you beat your goals, and how much revenue you saved the company. You put this much work into everything else you do at work. Why wouldn’t you take the time to put it into your own presentation?

Remember this. Your boss may say no. It may be out of their control. Be careful not to come across in a way that may jeopardize your current job. And, if your company isn’t willing to value you, be ready to begin looking for another one that will.

Angela Copeland, a career coach and founder of Copeland Coaching, can be reached at copelandcoaching.com.

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