Work With Us | 901-878-9758

Your Secret Search

Can you keep a secret? Benjamin Franklin said, “Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead.” Keeping private information private, especially about your job search, can be a tall order.

Getting an interview can be exciting, especially if it goes well. If you’ve wanted to leave your company for some time, the hope that a new job presents can leave you feeling on top of the world. And, the more interviews with one company, the surer you are you’ll get the job, right?

Some of the reasons I’ve heard for sharing this secret include, “I know this person is my friend, so it’s okay.” “My boss and I are close friends; they won’t mind.” “My company needs to know I’m looking, so they’ll be prepared if I do leave.” “I want to see if my company will give me a higher salary to stay.”

None of these reasons provide you any personal benefit. They give away your power and put your current job at risk.

When it comes to interviewing, nothing is a sure bet. Even if a company has talked to you ten times and is in love with you, the position may be put on hold for budget reasons. The hiring manager may leave, and the process may halt. The company could reorganize and the job may no longer be needed.

Until your offer is in writing and in your hands, there’s no offer. It could take you as long as a year or more to find a job. In the meantime, you still have bills to pay and a family to feed. Why put that in jeopardy?

Often, a boss you perceived to be your friend feels an obligation to let their boss know you have disclosed this information to them. Even if they like you, your search may be perceived as being disloyal to the company. In the worst-case scenario, you may be fired and asked to leave immediately.

Keep this in mind when it comes to asking for more money. If you don’t have a written job offer, what incentive does your company have to give you a raise? They don’t. There’s no good reason they should offer you any more money just because you’ve been interviewing.

If you tell colleagues about your search, don’t be surprised if the news gets around. People love to find something, or someone, to talk about. If you share information about your search, you’re setting yourself up to become next. The last thing you want is for word to get back to your boss before you’ve actually found a job.

As exciting as it is to share information about your job search, it’s 100 percent unwise to do so. You set yourself up for failure and disappointment on multiple levels that can be difficult to repair. When it comes to job searching, there’s no better alternative than to keep yours secret.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Researching a Realistic Replacement

We’ve all seen the news. There’s a shortage of workers. It’s hard to say exactly how we got here. There are so many factors involved. But, you can see the results of this shortage everywhere you look.

You may have noticed when a recruiter called you out of the blue. Recruiters are proactively calling candidates (who aren’t looking for jobs) more now than they have in years.  You can also see it when you go out for dinner. So many restaurants are short staffed, and are actively trying to hire. This pain is being felt across industries. Some companies are raising their own minimum wage, or are offering new benefits.

If you’re thinking of looking for a new job, you may want to take advantage of the new working environment. If you’ve enjoyed working from home, you might want that to continue. Or, you might want a more flexible schedule. You may also want to negotiate for more pay, given that it’s been a while since you changed jobs (and you may have the upper hand in the offer negotiation).

When you start looking for a new job, there are a few things you may want to keep an eye out for. The problem is, not every company has come to terms with the current job search environment. If you find yourself talking with one of these unrealistic companies, the road ahead is going to be longer and more difficult.

So, what should you look for? Well, first, look to see how many roles the company is currently trying to hire for overall. If they are only hiring for a handful of positions, there’s a greater chance they haven’t had to feel the pain of the shortage just yet. Similarly, if the job you’re applying to posted for the very first time a few days ago, the company may not realize that it’s harder to find candidates now than before.

You can also find signs in the job description itself. Companies who are aware of the current market will typically list the job as remote or work from home. Or, the company may make mentions in the job description of a flexible work environment.

Some companies that are clued in will include more information in the job description to sell you on their benefits. This is a turnaround from the past, when many companies rarely included anything about what they do.

Last, pay attention to how many hard skills the company is looking for in one person. Years ago, a company called me looking for a very specific candidate. They wanted someone with selling skills, programming skills, project management skills, and marketing skills. A company with a long list of different requirements has likely not come to the realization yet that there’s a shortage.

This is the perfect time to look for a new job. But, do your research to find a company that will work with you.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

What the Great Resignation Means to You

In the last few weeks, countless news stories have popped up about the Great Resignation. Millions of American workers are quitting their jobs. You’ve probably heard about it (and maybe even considered it). So, what does it mean for your career?

If you’ve thought of quitting your job recently, I don’t blame you. If the COVID pandemic has given us anything, it’s given us time to think. We’ve spent more time at home and alone in the last year than any years past. All of that quiet time has allowed us to reflect on important topics. It’s given us the space to consider what is really important in our lives, and what isn’t so important after all.

It has also given us a chance to try out a new lifestyle when it comes to work. Suddenly, many people aren’t doing a daily commute each way. Perhaps they’re spending more time with immediate family. Many people have learned that working from home really is possible. It’s given us a new perspective on the concept of work life balance.

If you’ve found yourself unhappy with your current work situation, the good news is this. It’s a great time to look for something new. Companies are being more flexible than ever before. And, you likely now have options beyond your local area. This means that there may be more job options available to you than before the pandemic started.

That said, you should take this to heart. Don’t assume that the way things are today is the way they’ll be tomorrow. For example, the apartment rental market one year ago was amazing. If you wanted to rent a new apartment, you could find a deal on a great place. People were leaving cities in droves. However, in the last few months, the entire situation has changed. People are moving back into cities. And, finding an apartment has become much harder and much more expensive.

What I’m saying is this. Things change. The market is great for job seekers today – right now. But, in a few months, that may no longer be the case. If you aren’t happy at your current job, now is the time to look.

But also, don’t take your current job for granted. Keep putting in the same effort today that you put in every other day. Don’t assume a new job is waiting around the next corner. Looking for a new job takes time. You may need this job. And, even if you find a new job, you’ll eventually need references from your current job.

Do your best and doors will open. Nurture your existing job, and you’ll be able to wait until a job you really like comes along. The last thing you want is to run from one bad situation to another – or to find yourself stuck in a negative environment. In other words, don’t resign today. Keep steady until you find something new.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Asking the Right Questions

Sometimes, the devil really is in the details. This is especially true when it comes to the questions you ask when you’re looking for a job. Asking the wrong question, or not asking the right question can get you into trouble when you least expect it. And, it can be tricky to know when to ask questions.

There are a few good rules of thumb to follow. The first applies to networking. When you’re meeting someone new, they want to get to know you first. They (in theory) have no specific ulterior motive, and they hope you don’t either. When you first meet someone, avoid asking if they’re hiring. Chances are good that they’re not hiring, and if you ask this up front, you may send the message that you’re not interested to get to know them unless they can give you something. But, do ask them if you can stay in touch. Ask to connect on LinkedIn. Ask to have coffee (virtual or in person). Relationship building may eventually lead you down the path of a new job.

Another situation to be on the lookout for is when you find a job posted. You’ve found the perfect job at the perfect company. And, you’ve either found a great connection there – or you already have one. When you’re reaching out about a specific job, be up front about it. A hiring manager will want to know that you‘d like to be considered, so be sure to ask. Ask them if they have time to meet with you to discuss the position. Don’t hint around and hope they’ll get the drift. Be direct.

The most important place for questions is the job interview. It’s truly amazing how much your questions can influence the outcome of an interview. First, have questions – lots of them. Having a long list of questions doesn’t mean you have to ask all of them, but it does mean you’ll have options to go to when it’s your turn to ask questions. One of the primary complaints I’ve heard from hiring managers is that the candidate didn’t ask questions. The hiring manager assumes the candidate isn’t interested in the position (or worse, is lazy), while the candidate simply feels all their questions were answered during the job interview. Avoid this situation by asking a few questions at the end. But, keep your questions focused on the job. Do not ask questions that reflect an “all about me” attitude. Topics to stay away from include pay, vacation time, or anything else that isn’t specific to the work itself. And, always ask about the company’s timeline and what their expected next steps are.

As important as qualifications are, so are first impressions. The questions you ask will influence a hiring manager’s decision. Fortunately, there’s time to plan. If you draft your questions in advance and ask a friend for feedback, you’ll be on your way to success.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Job Offers Are Like Busses

The title of my column today may sound a bit confusing. It comes from one of my own mentors. Years ago, when I was finishing graduate school, I spent a significant amount of time searching for the right job.

Occasionally, one would pop up that would seem almost right. It would have a great job description. The company seemed stable. The team seemed interesting. But, there was something about the hiring manager that was off – or perhaps the company wasn’t offering a competitive salary. Many parts of the job would be great, but something would be off.

I would meet with my mentor to tell him about the jobs I was considering, and discuss the pros and cons of each. If a job seemed like the wrong fit, he would encourage me to walk away. The thought of turning down an offer without another in hand was nerve-wracking. My mentor would then remind me, “Jobs are like buses. Just wait; another one is always coming.”

He felt it was more important to find the right fit, than to hope you could take every job that came along. Looking back, these were wise words. Who else in your life do you spend as much time with as your boss and co-workers? For most, the answer is your spouse. You typically don’t choose to marry your first date. Why would you expect that at work?

Often, we want to take every job when we’re feeling desperate. We’re miserable in our current position and we think that anything would be better – even if it were just for a short time.

The problem with this strategy is complex. First, your next job may have just as many problems are your current job, if not more. As the saying goes, sometimes the devil you know is better than the one you don’t.

More importantly though, planning to take a job for a short time forces you to explain why you’re looking for a new job just after accepting one. This means that you’ll be explaining all the dirt on your old company, including the ways that you didn’t get along with your boss or co-workers.

When you choose to wait and select the right job, you’ll find yourself there for more than just a short time. While you’re interviewing, you’ll be able to focus on the positives of what you want in the future rather than the negatives from the past. Whether it comes to interviewing or negotiating your offer, focusing on the positive puts you in a much stronger position.

When you’re having a tough day, just try to remember that jobs are like buses. Just wait. Another one is coming, and you want to be sure you get on the right one.

Look around to see if you find remote jobs that are posted in other locations. You may be able to do them from your current city!

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Pandemic Purge: Employees looking to leave at record rates

When you look at it, the numbers are staggering. Workers are looking to change jobs during or after the pandemic at a very high rate. A number of surveys have been conducted on the topic, and somewhere between thirty-five and sixty-five percent of all employees plan to find a new job soon.

One of the top reasons cited is corporate culture. The pandemic has drawn out for over a year. Not all companies have handled the situation well. Some have forced employees into endless meetings, or have been unforgiving with personal matters. The experience has been especially isolating for young employees who may be home alone, without an option to socialize with coworkers or even to go out with friends.

Many organizations have failed to recognize how tough working from home in this situation can be. Although, in fairness, those at the top are likely struggling with their own pandemic challenges. In the end, employees whose employers haven’t handled COVID well have had enough. They’re ready to move on.

In addition, many people have found added balance during this crazy time. They are reprioritizing what’s important to them. They are no longer interested in the corporate rat race or working themselves to the bone. These employees are not only looking to switch companies, they’re looking to switch careers completely. They want to do something different, and something that better suits their personal values and priorities.

Similarly, many workers have taken advantage of the work from home situation the pandemic has provided. They’ve left expensive cities and have moved closer to family. Many of those workers are not interested to return to the city or to the office anytime soon. They’re now looking for permanently remote jobs.

This change will present interesting opportunities for employees. The more people who change jobs, the more jobs will be available. And, all of this change may in fact give job seekers the upper hand. They may be considered for roles they were previously thought to be less than qualified for. And, employers will be forced to be more competitive with regards to benefits such as work from home.

Today, some candidates are interviewing all the way to the offer stage. Then, if the company is unwilling to allow them to work from home permanently, the candidate is walking away. This is something we never would have talked about two years ago, because the strategy would have had little chance of working. But, today, companies are being forced to rethink work from home in order to remain competitive.

What are you doing to prepare? This is an unprecedented time. With that, there may also be unprecedented opportunities. If you’ve thought of looking for a new job, it’s time to get your resume and LinkedIn profile in order. If you want to switch careers completely, take an inventory of your transferrable skills. Set up networking calls, and get yourself back out there.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach