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Be Kind to Yourself

There are many days when 2020 feels like the year that will never end. In 2019, if someone had been taking bets about how this year would play out, we all would have lost. One of the most challenging things about this year has been self-care. And, it’s that same self-care that allows our best selves to show up for friends, family — and in the workplace.

It is so easy to get caught up with work. We’re living with work right now. Working from home can intensify the day, and it can extend our hours. No longer are we taking the same coffee breaks to chat with colleagues about the weekend. And, we don’t have somewhere to be right after work.

The endless video calls can also be draining. Many people are sitting, staring into a tiny computer camera all day long.

In many places, gyms are closed. It has made falling off of our workout routines the new norm. Somehow, even though we’re eating at home more, it’s become harder to eat healthy. It’s easier to find yourself eating chips and pizza than ever before.

The problem is, all of this working, lack of exercise, and poor diet will eventually catch up to us. And, I’m not talking about in terms of our waistlines. I’m talking about how we feel day to day.

Working long hours is only helpful if you’re feeling like yourself. If you’re dragging through the day, it’s just one long, unproductive day bleeding into the next one. If you’re feeling bad, it’s time to pull yourself out of it, one bit at a time.

The first step is sleep. Getting good rest is so important. Then, it’s about trying to eat a little healthier each day. And, don’t forget about drinking enough water to stay hydrated.

It’s also important to keep up your social connections. This is harder to do right now in many ways. But, the good news is that more and more people are using the phone and video chats to stay in touch.

Last, work to create boundaries between work and home. Create a daily schedule and stick to it. When you’re working, focus on work. When work is over each day (at a predetermined time), stop working. Don’t go back to it unless there is a truly exceptional reason (such as an emergency).

All of these things seem basic on some level. That’s very true, until they aren’t. We are all struggling so hard to create a new normal that works for us. Some days will be better than others. Give yourself the space for bad days. Be kind to yourself even when you’re struggling. And work to improve your self-care routines, so that each day may be a little better than the one before.

Unfortunately, we may be in this challenging situation for a while. It’s important to take care of ourselves along the way.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Best Job Search Apps

As you know, we’re facing record breaking unemployment. Unemployment for July was up by 1.8 million, with a rate of 10.2 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. These staggering numbers mean that many people are looking for new jobs. If you are a job seeker, you’re probably wondering where to begin. You may wonder where to find the best job search websites, and the best job search apps.

There are many websites where you can look for jobs. There are three main sites that I recommend for most jobs: LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and Indeed. Each of these sites has a great app.

If you work in certain specialized fields, there are other sites you should also be aware of. For example, if you’re looking for a government job, you should check out usa.gov. If you looking for a job related to sports, check out teamworkonline.com. There are many other sites, but let’s start with the basics of the top three.

LinkedIn offers job seekers many features. You can create an online profile that is essentially an online resume or portfolio of your work. LinkedIn also gives you the opportunity to connect with people who work at the companies you’re interested in. And, it has job postings. The job postings offer various data points, including how many people have applied to a job and how you rank in comparison to other candidates. In addition, you may be able to see an estimated salary and the human resources recruiter who posted the job. Applying is fairly straightforward, and there are optional features available such as asking for a referral.

Glassdoor and Indeed are now owned by the same parent company. They’re both excellent websites with unique features.

Glassdoor is built on employee feedback. They have similar job postings to those offered on LinkedIn. But, they also give quite a bit of information about each company. You can look at how well ranked a company is by its employees. You can also see how much the company pays employees for specific roles. And, you can look up interview questions the company may ask.

Indeed has long been hailed as the world’s largest job website. They have more job postings than any other website. Indeed also shares estimated salary data with job seekers, along with company reviews.

As you can see, each job website adds its own value. On top of that, you want to look where the jobs are listed. Not every company puts each job on all three sites. You don’t want to miss jobs by only focusing on one site. Use each site in the way that it best fits you. Then, go directly to company websites for companies you really love. And, keep your eyes open for other sites that may be more specific to your career.

Last, remember that applying online is a numbers game. Get started if you want to play.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Returning to Corporate

Small businesses are a special thing in our country.  Being able to start something from a vision and grow it is a gift. But, the pandemic is taking a toll on small business owners. Many are reconsidering the idea of being self-employed. If you find yourself in this situation, there are a few things to consider.

First, job seeking takes time. It takes a lot of time. Not only is there the work of applying, but there is networking and interviewing. If you’re thinking of going back to corporate, don’t wait until you’re desperate. Start now. It could take many months, even in a good situation.

People who work in a corporate environment will have a hard time understanding what it was like to be self-employed. They will ask insensitive questions about whether or not your business is failing. They may ask if you’re skills are out of date. They will have a very hard time picturing how running your own business has prepared you for this moment. They won’t relate to how hard owning a business is, how stressful it is, or how unstable it can be at times. Rehearse your answers ahead of time, and try not to react poorly when asked why you want to leave.

Don’t look for the perfect fit. This sounds counterintuitive. You’re giving up a dream. It should be for a good reason. You should find the perfect opportunity. You want to find something you’re going to be just as good at and even more passionate about. You’ve worked too hard to walk away for the wrong job.

I would argue that this is the wrong approach. Reentering the corporate world is very hard. It’s like switching career fields. You need to get back into the pool to show everyone you can still swim. It shows people that you can work well with others, and that you don’t mind taking direction. (This is another big fear of your future hiring manager.)

Realize that it’s okay to grieve. For most people, giving up a business feels like a death. Your pour your heart into a business the way you would pour your heart into a child. You plan your future around it. It becomes your identity. Moving on from your business is hard.

If you decide to transition back into corporate, reach out to those around you for help. Call your friends and colleagues. Contact your college career resources department. Sign up for LinkedIn. Even those in the corporate world get help when they are looking. There’s no reason you should do it alone.

Just remember. The transition back to corporate will not be easy. But, at the end, you will have the stability you’re seeking. You’ll have a reliable paycheck, and solid health benefits. You may even have 401-K matching. As hard as it is to give up your business, there is a bright spot waiting for you.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Leveling the Playing Field

Internships are an important part of any college education. They allow students to test out their skills, and to dip their toes into their future careers. It can help to confirm interest in one field. Or, it can help to redirect interest to a new field.

During my four years in college, I was fortunate to have completed four summer internships. For two summers, I worked as an engineer for General Motors. For one, I worked at Westinghouse. And, for one semester, I taught photography at a Boys and Girls Club.

Each experience was valuable in its own way. They helped me to learn what I liked and didn’t like about companies. They helped me to learn what I was good at. And, they built up my resume, so that I could compete for better jobs when I graduated.

As an engineering student, internships are paid. Not only did I receive a respectable salary, but I also received relocation to Detroit and Pittsburgh.

When I moved on to business school, I wasn’t so lucky. While studying for my MBA, many of my classmates opted to take unpaid internships. I was shocked to know that this was even an option. But, the market was competitive so in order to get any internship, students had to be willing to work for free.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to do this. I put myself through graduate school and I could not afford to work for months on end for free, while also living in Los Angeles. Instead of taking an internship, I opted to graduate early. Although things worked out, I do believe I would have benefitted greatly from an internship as I was transitioning from engineering into the business world.

This brings up a timely issue. If internships are an important part of any college education, why should they be unpaid? Sure, the company is helping to give the student an experience. They’re teaching them things. But, the students are also giving something in return. And, is it really right that students who cannot afford to work for free may be at a disadvantage when competing for jobs post-graduation?

Although internships have been significantly cut due to COVID, there is one bright spot. Most internships are virtual. This means that a student does not have to have the money to relocate to the city where the internship is. And, they can work for companies anywhere. So, despite that internships may be unpaid, the new virtual reality we’re all working in is helping to level the playing field.

If you’re thinking of hiring an intern, there’s no better time. Internships aren’t just for the summer. But, keep this in mind. You don’t have to pay a college student much in order for them to survive. But, paying a little will allow that student who is making their own way to have a shot at your job, and their future.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Empathy: Why We Need It

“He’s just not paying attention in meetings!” “She’s just not the same person right now.” “It’s like he doesn’t care anymore about his work!” “She missed her deadline.” These are all things people are saying about their colleagues right now.

I get it. You’re frustrated at work. Not everyone is carrying their weight in the same reliable way as they were before March of 2020. But, this is the thing. There is more going on behind that work from home computer screen than you know. The pandemic is not impacting everyone equally. It’s just not. And it is very likely that your coworkers will not feel comfortable to tell you just what’s going on in their personal lives.

For example, you may have one coworker who is trying to homeschool their children while maintaining their job. Another may be in poor health themselves, and they may not be able to venture outside for the things they need. Some people are dealing with aging parents who are homebound. Other colleagues may have family members who are dealing with terminal illness, while this is all going on. Some people have lost family members or friends and have been unable to grieve in the normal way. Single people have often been completely removed from other human beings for months, longing for real connection. And, some people have someone in their house who has COVID.

We tend to believe that hard work is the answer to everything. If you want to make your way to the top, you’ve got to climb. The best person should win. It’s a little like Darwin. But, really, we are facing a global pandemic. It’s worse than anything we’ve likely ever experienced in our lifetime, and on a massive, massive scale that is extending on for months.

People are struggling. They have good days. They have bad days. And, they have some very bad days. It doesn’t make the person less worthy of the job they had in February. And, I get it. We have to make money in order for businesses to stay in business.

This situation reminds me of growing up in Oklahoma. We had tornadoes; really big, destructive tornadoes. Sometimes, one would come through and tear up entire neighborhoods. People would be without homes, without water, and without power for days. The only way they survived was this: together. They pulled together, and together, they all made it out.

That’s what we have to do here. I know, it’s frustrating. It feels unfair when you have to do a little more work than normal. It’s upsetting when a coworker is late on something they promised you. It’s annoying when someone takes a day off for their mental health out of the blue.

But, this is the reality we’re living in. To make it out, we need to do it together. And, we need to do it with empathy for one another.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach