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Researching a Realistic Replacement

We’ve all seen the news. There’s a shortage of workers. It’s hard to say exactly how we got here. There are so many factors involved. But, you can see the results of this shortage everywhere you look.

You may have noticed when a recruiter called you out of the blue. Recruiters are proactively calling candidates (who aren’t looking for jobs) more now than they have in years.  You can also see it when you go out for dinner. So many restaurants are short staffed, and are actively trying to hire. This pain is being felt across industries. Some companies are raising their own minimum wage, or are offering new benefits.

If you’re thinking of looking for a new job, you may want to take advantage of the new working environment. If you’ve enjoyed working from home, you might want that to continue. Or, you might want a more flexible schedule. You may also want to negotiate for more pay, given that it’s been a while since you changed jobs (and you may have the upper hand in the offer negotiation).

When you start looking for a new job, there are a few things you may want to keep an eye out for. The problem is, not every company has come to terms with the current job search environment. If you find yourself talking with one of these unrealistic companies, the road ahead is going to be longer and more difficult.

So, what should you look for? Well, first, look to see how many roles the company is currently trying to hire for overall. If they are only hiring for a handful of positions, there’s a greater chance they haven’t had to feel the pain of the shortage just yet. Similarly, if the job you’re applying to posted for the very first time a few days ago, the company may not realize that it’s harder to find candidates now than before.

You can also find signs in the job description itself. Companies who are aware of the current market will typically list the job as remote or work from home. Or, the company may make mentions in the job description of a flexible work environment.

Some companies that are clued in will include more information in the job description to sell you on their benefits. This is a turnaround from the past, when many companies rarely included anything about what they do.

Last, pay attention to how many hard skills the company is looking for in one person. Years ago, a company called me looking for a very specific candidate. They wanted someone with selling skills, programming skills, project management skills, and marketing skills. A company with a long list of different requirements has likely not come to the realization yet that there’s a shortage.

This is the perfect time to look for a new job. But, do your research to find a company that will work with you.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Returning to Corporate

Small businesses are a special thing in our country.  Being able to start something from a vision and grow it is a gift. But, the pandemic is taking a toll on small business owners. Many are reconsidering the idea of being self-employed. If you find yourself in this situation, there are a few things to consider.

First, job seeking takes time. It takes a lot of time. Not only is there the work of applying, but there is networking and interviewing. If you’re thinking of going back to corporate, don’t wait until you’re desperate. Start now. It could take many months, even in a good situation.

People who work in a corporate environment will have a hard time understanding what it was like to be self-employed. They will ask insensitive questions about whether or not your business is failing. They may ask if you’re skills are out of date. They will have a very hard time picturing how running your own business has prepared you for this moment. They won’t relate to how hard owning a business is, how stressful it is, or how unstable it can be at times. Rehearse your answers ahead of time, and try not to react poorly when asked why you want to leave.

Don’t look for the perfect fit. This sounds counterintuitive. You’re giving up a dream. It should be for a good reason. You should find the perfect opportunity. You want to find something you’re going to be just as good at and even more passionate about. You’ve worked too hard to walk away for the wrong job.

I would argue that this is the wrong approach. Reentering the corporate world is very hard. It’s like switching career fields. You need to get back into the pool to show everyone you can still swim. It shows people that you can work well with others, and that you don’t mind taking direction. (This is another big fear of your future hiring manager.)

Realize that it’s okay to grieve. For most people, giving up a business feels like a death. Your pour your heart into a business the way you would pour your heart into a child. You plan your future around it. It becomes your identity. Moving on from your business is hard.

If you decide to transition back into corporate, reach out to those around you for help. Call your friends and colleagues. Contact your college career resources department. Sign up for LinkedIn. Even those in the corporate world get help when they are looking. There’s no reason you should do it alone.

Just remember. The transition back to corporate will not be easy. But, at the end, you will have the stability you’re seeking. You’ll have a reliable paycheck, and solid health benefits. You may even have 401-K matching. As hard as it is to give up your business, there is a bright spot waiting for you.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

Military Transitions

One question I hear often from readers is about military transitions. Many members of the military devote the first twenty years of their career to the US Military. Around age forty, they’ll retire and start entirely new careers in the civilian world. I receive questions about how to successfully make this change.

The number one thing I see that trips up people transitioning is this. They don’t realize just how hard it is. And, neither do those around them. The military will often help people who are transitioning by offering a class about how to get a job. Many of the people I’ve met who have attended this class assume that the transition will be quick, painless, and easy. They also assume that they will be compensated the same or more than they were in the military.

To make matters more complex, their loved ones also believe the transition should be easy. Unfortunately, this is a problem not just with military folks, but with anyone looking for a job. Your family can never understand what’s taking you so long. This can leave the job seeker feeling lonely and deflated, as if they’re the only one who has ever had to work this hard to find a job.

If we can agree that job searching is hard, then what? The people I’ve seen with the smoothest transitions have done three things well. First, they’ve started early. They didn’t wait until they were out of the military to begin looking for something new. Second, they put their fears and limitations on hold. In other words, they were willing to step out of their comfort zones to explore jobs they may not have considered. And, third, they kept their personal expenses low. In the civilian world, a paycheck is not a guarantee. Especially in the beginning, if you can keep your costs down, it will be less stressful if your search takes time.

Beyond that, listen to yourself. When you are job searching, you’d be surprised at how many people come out of the woodwork with advice. Your great uncle Bob who you barely know will suddenly have an opinion on what you should be doing with your life. If you’ve spent your entire career in one field, this guidance can feel good. But, don’t fall into the trap. Great uncle Bob probably has no real experience in the work he’s advising you on.

Start early. Form a support group. Reach out to people who have been through this transition before. Don’t be afraid to reach out to people you don’t know through networking site, LinkedIn. And, be on the lookout for companies that specifically recruit transitioning members of the military.

Last, but not least, be patient with yourself. You’re starting an entirely new career. This is hard for anyone – military or civilian. It takes time. It’s going to be hard. But, in the end, it’s worth it.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

193 | Quitting, Not Settling | Dr. Lynn Marie Morski, Quitting By Design

Episode 193 is live! This week, we talk with Dr. Lynn Marie Morski in San Diego, California.

Dr. Morski has studied medicine, law, and multimedia design – and is a quitting evangelist at her company Quitting By Design. She’s also the author of her book Quitting by Design.

On today’s episode, Lynn Marie shares:

  • Why is it okay to quit, and why is it not okay to settle?
  • Should we quit a job before we have another job? When should we and when shouldn’t we?
  • Why do quitters come out on top?

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about Dr. Morski’s work, check out her website quittingbydesign.com where you can access her blog, podcast, and her book Quitting by Design.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find the show!

192 | The Holy Sh!t Moment | James Fell, Author

Episode 192 is live! This week, we talk with James Fell in Alberta, Canada.

James is a health and fitness expert. He’s also the author of the book The Holy Sh!t Moment: How Lasting Change Can Happen in an Instant.

On today’s episode, James shares:

  • What causes us to have an epiphany?
  • If we find ourselves dreaming about getting a new job, but unable to move forward, what can we do to turn our
    fantasy into a reality?
  • How does our physical health tie to our mental health?

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about James’ work, check out his website bodyforwife.com which also links to his book The Holy Sh!t Moment: How Lasting Change Can Happen in an Instant.

Thank YOU for listening! If you’ve enjoyed the show today, don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts! When you subscribe, it helps to make the show easier for other job seekers to find the show!

155 | Career Rebranding – Isaac Lake, Hilton

Episode 155 is live! This week, we talk with Isaac Lake in Memphis, TN. Isaac is a Manager of Brand Performance Support at Hilton. Previously, Isaac worked at the University of Memphis where he was the Manager of Facilities and Programs at the University Center. This is Isaac’s second time on the Copeland Coaching Podcast. He’s a former client and a friend. On this episode, we check back in with Isaac after 3.5 years at Hilton.

On today’s episode, Isaac shares:

  • The biggest differences between working in a corporate environment and at a university
  • Which transferable skills (and side hustles) helped him to transition into corporate
  • The role of networking in the job search
  • Advice for others looking to make a major career shift

Listen and learn more! You can play the podcast here, or download it on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher.

To learn more about Isaac, you can find him on LinkedIn.

Thanks to everyone for listening! And, thank you to those who sent me questions. You can send your questions to Angela@CopelandCoaching.com. You can also send me questions via Twitter. I’m @CopelandCoach. And, on Facebook, I am Copeland Coaching.

Don’t forget to help me out. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave me a review!