Technology is a tool, not a key.

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I keep running into the same issue, over and over. Today, it’s weighing heavy on my mind, so I wanted to take a moment to share my thoughts with you.

All the time, I see job seekers who are working really, really hard. They’re at home, perfecting their resume and cover letter. And, they’re spending countless hours applying for jobs online. And, I mean HOURS. It could literally be their full time job.

After months of going through this exercise with no results, they’ll come to me. By this time, the job seeker is completely demoralized. They’ve lost hope. They’ve decided that they don’t have enough skills to procure any kind of job. They clearly are not a desirable candidate. And, they’re frankly not sure how they made it this far in life WITH a job. Clearly, they aren’t cut out for today’s new job market (…or so they think.)

It’s a terrible situation. The job seeker is giving up on themselves. And, why?

Because we are being conditioned (I hate to sound so dramatic, but frankly, it’s true) to think that ALL we need is our computer to find a job. As long as we have an internet connection and a LinkedIn account, we should be all set, right? Wrong.

I know that times have changed. I know that job seeking has evolved in the past twenty years. I get it. I’ve been here the entire time.

But, what hasn’t changed is this: PEOPLE. And, people make hiring decisions. When is the last time you hired someone from a blind ad on Indeed? It’s probably been a while. Instead, you reach out to your friends to see if they’d be interested. Then, you reach out to their network to see if someone they know might be interested.

I get it. Companies have been telling us all, “Submit your application on our website. If you’re a fit, we’ll call you.” Heck, the computer engineer in me wishes this were true.

But, it’s not! The online application systems are flawed. And, even if they weren’t flawed, there is no substitute for a personal connection.

The next time you get an automated rejection e-mail that says you weren’t a good fit for the job, don’t take it so personally. It’s not a reflection of your skills. It’s a reflection of the medium you chose to apply.

Instead of relying on technology to get a job, use it as a tool. Use websites like LinkedIn to find the hiring manager. Then, reach out to them directly and network with them — the old fashioned way. As much as technology has changed, one thing stays the same — people hire people. If you know the ones who are hiring, you’re more likely to be hired. It’s as simple as that.

I hope these tips have helped you. Visit CopelandCoaching.com to find more tips to improve your job search. If I can be of assistance to you, don’t hesitate to reach out to me here.

Also, be sure to subscribe to my Copeland Coaching Podcast on iTunes or Stitcher where I discuss career advice every Tuesday! If you’ve already heard the podcast and enjoy it, please consider leaving a review in iTunes or Stitcher.

Happy hunting!

Angela Copeland
@CopelandCoach

 

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